Tag archive

electrolyte drink

Hydration On The Run

in BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING by
Adapted from Matt Fitzgerald

Hydration during running is not as complicated as you may have been led to believe.

When you run, you sweat. The more you sweat, the more your blood volume decreases. The more your blood volume decreases, the harder your heart has to work to deliver oxygen to your working muscles.

Sounds dangerous, but it’s really not. Runners almost never experience dehydration levels sufficient to cause major health consequences. But normal levels of dehydration will make you feel uncomfortable and cause you to slow down.

Drinking while you run will limit these negative effects of dehydration. But what should you drink, how much, and when?

SOS can be compared to an IV drip. It works just as rapidly but is safer and cheaper at combating mild to moderate dehydration. Try it here

In the past, athletes were encouraged to drink as much as possible during exercise, or at least to drink enough to completely offset dehydration (that is, to drink enough to prevent any decrease in body weight during exercise). However, it is now understood that this is bad advice, for two reasons.

Firstly, it is possible to drink too much during exercise. Forcing yourself to swallow more fluid than your body really needs while running may cause gastrointestinal distress, and in extreme cases it can cause a dangerous condition known as water intoxication, or hyponatremia. Secondly, research has shown that drinking to completely offset sweating offers no advantage with respect to performance or body temperature regulation compared to drinking by thirst.

The new exercise hydration advice is in fact to drink according to your thirst. As long as you keep an adequate supply of a palatable drink accessible during your runs, you will naturally drink enough to optimize your performance if you just drink as often and as much as your thirst dictates.

Dehydration only affects performance in workouts lasting longer than an hour, so you don’t have to drink during workouts that are shorter than an hour. However, you can if you like.

Magnesium and Muscle Cramps

in ATHLETES/BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING/TRIATHLON by

Anyone who has suffered from a muscle cramp during or after exercise understands that it’s definitely something worth trying to avoid.

For those who have been lucky enough to evade them, a muscle cramp is a sudden, involuntary, painful contraction of a muscle. These symptoms generally ease off within seconds to minutes but are often accompanied by a palpable knotting of the muscle. While magnesium does play many important roles in the body, unfortunately the prevention/reduction of exercise-induced muscle cramps is not one of these. It is easy to be confused considering the heavy marketing for magnesium supplements and the prevention of cramps, but to date the scientific research suggests that there is no strong link between exercise-induced muscle cramps and magnesium supplementation.

While oral magnesium does not appear to have any beneficial effects in athletes with adequate magnesium, supplementation may improve performance in individuals with a diagnosed deficiency. Those undertaking a high volume chronic training load (e.g. long distance runners) or those with a restricted energy intake may be at risk of magnesium deficiency, although this is not common and you should always get this checked out with your GP before supplementation. It is worthwhile noting that the intestinal absorption of magnesium varies depending on how much magnesium the body needs. If there is too much magnesium, the body will only absorb as much as it needs. So how much do I need? I hear you ask. The recommendations suggest that adults consume a range between 350 and 400 mg/day as the upper limit. Most individuals who are eating a healthy well balanced diet will be acquiring the required amount of magnesium through wholefoods. Good food sources of magnesium include vegetables, legumes, fish, nuts and whole grains. For example, 30g of brazil nuts provides ~100mg, and ½ cup cooked quinoa provides ~50mg of magnesium.

1 litre of SOS Rehydrate provides 20% of the recommended daily intake of Magnesium

Ok, so what does cause cramps and what can I do to avoid them?

What we do know about cramps is that the main risk factors include; family history of cramping, previous occurrence of cramps during or after exercise, increased exercise intensity and duration, and inadequate conditioning for the activity. This explains the classic example of cramping on race day. During a race you’re typically working at a higher intensity than normal, and often over a longer duration than during training.

From a nutrition perspective, glycogen depletion (insufficient carbohydrate) or low energy availability can also contribute to fatigue and therefore cramping. This highlights the importance of getting your nutrition and fuelling plans for long sessions and races spot on.

original source

Marathon Fueling by Laura Thweatt – 1st American 2015 NYC Marathon

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by
Whilst the weather may be cooling off in US and Europe, many of us are starting to gear up for two iconic marathons – Boston and London – early in the spring of 2016.
Now is the time to sort out the training plan and buy the kit, but many a runner forgets one key ingredient: Electrolytes.  Yes we all know the marketing gimmick about the gels but its electrolytes that get you round.  After all when you sweat it’s not just water you loose, its sodium, potassium, chloride and magnesium.  If you don’t replace these and in the correct amounts, then your training and ultimately your race day will be adversely affected without you even knowing it.
SOS asked Laura Thweatt, the 1st American home in the 2015 NYC Marathon, to give us her lowdown on training and racing from a marathon fueling perspective.
Who's ready to run?!
Who’s ready to run?!
The Learning Cycle:
Going into my first marathon I knew very little in regards to the type of fueling needed to successfully complete 26.2. What I did know was that I did not want to find myself at mile 15 running straight into the dreaded “wall.” Having been a competitive runner for the last twelve years I understood that electrolyte drinks were a key component in hydrating pre race and rehydrating post race. As we sweat during a run or race we are loosing important minerals, such as sodium, that a few gulps of water cannot replace. During a marathon it is crucial that you are rehydrating and replenishing what you are loosing though sweat in two plus hours of exertion.
Why SOS:
My coach Lee Troop kept stressing the importance of getting fluids down during the race, and that the gels were there as back up just in case I was struggling to get down my drinks. SOS Rehydrate provided the perfect balance of sugars and sodium, two essential components in preventing the bonk by replenishing the body’s losses.
Practice makes perfect:
Long runs are a great way to practice fueling and thus finding out what works for you individually.
When and how much SOS did you drink:
I took 5 x 8floz (250ml) bottles of SOS one at 5k, 10k, 15k, 20k, 25k.
Favourite Flavour:
I used SOS Mango as my go to flavor in training as well as in my debut at NYC Marathon. Good luck to everyone out there training! May the force be with you 🙂
 Laura Thweatt electrolyte drink SOS
There you have it.  Marathon Fueling the simple way.  Thanks Laura and best of rehydrated luck for marathon number 2.
SOS wishes everyone safe, fun and rehydrated running.  May this in some small way help you achieve your goals.

The importance of self massage in recovery

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

The Importance of Self Massage in Recovery:

Recovery is vital to performance. The body needs time to repair itself. Self massage and proper hydration are the keys to the door.

This month we have teamed up with the team at Addaday who have kindly offered to give away several of their cool massage stix. We have been using one and they rock.  We will also throw in a months supply of the new SOS because you know the importance of hydration in keeping muscles loose!  Share and tag this post #sosaddaday to be in for a chance to win.

 

Perfect mix, SOS with Addaday
Perfect mix, SOS with Addaday

Here Addaday’s distinguished PT, Robert Forster explains the benefits:

 

Every physical therapist wants you to know that your body needs attention every day for it to continue to function properly throughout life. Whether you exercise regularly or not, everyday life leaves your muscles tired and tight, and your joints off center. Stretching and self massage techniques are the key tools to mitigate the physical toll of everyday life, and of your workouts.

With athletes and desk workers alike, much of our work is focused on mitigating the damaging effects of daily activities. Long days, poorly-designed chairs, and poor posture all work to corrupt your alignment and stress your joints.

So why should we use self massage??

 

1) Increase circulation: Manipulation of the muscles causes the blood vessels to dilate and pump more blood into the muscles and fascia.

Benefits:

  • Before Exercise: warms up the tissues and make them more pliable to stretching, and less prone to injury.
  • After Exercise: flushes the residue of exercise (i.e. metabolic waste products) from the muscles to hasten recovery.

 

2) Treats Connective Tissue scarring and muscular adhesions, which result from normal training and body imbalances.

Benefits:

  • Before Exercise: breaks down dysfunctional scarring that forms as your body attempts to heal from the stress of your previous workouts. Helps create functional scarring that makes you more resilient to injury.
  • After Exercise: relaxes tired and tight muscles, works out the knots (muscle spasms) that occur when muscles are overtaxed.

 

3) Sensory Stimulation from the proprietary, textured surfaces of massage tools stimulate the nervous system to create a reflex relaxation of the muscles, much the same way acupressure works.

Benefits:

  • Before Exercise: works out the knots and relaxes the small muscle spasms, known as trigger points, which result from workouts and daily life and interfere with proper muscle and joint function.
  • After Exercise: relaxes muscle spasm that occurs in fatigued or overtaxed muscles.

 

“Recovery is when your body actually grows stronger and more efficient. It is when the benefits of your hard training are realized. Working hard is easy, everyone knows how to work hard, but those who work hard at recover are the ones who win,”

— Bob Kersee, the most successful track & field coach, with over 50 Olympic medal-winning performances.

 

Only during recovery does your fitness grow. Workouts don’t build fitness, they break your body down, and only if you allow recovery time and actively help your tissues heal, do you become stronger and more fit.

 

Hydration the SOS way
Hydration the SOS way

Recovery is not laying on the sofa eating comfort food. There is nothing passive about recovery. Recovery is an active process where light “adaptation” workouts stimulate recovery better than rest alone. Light workouts are akin to the self-cleaning oven, where the heat is turned up to burn off the residue from cooking but no roast is placed inside. Light workouts provide the body the same opportunity to do house cleaning functions without having to recover from the damaging effects of a new workout. With the increased core temperature associated with recovery workouts, your body sets into motion an army of heat shock proteins that immediately go to work repairing an rebuilding tissues damaged by training.

 

With light activity, the vascular system is stimulated to increase blood flow to the muscles, delivering oxygen and nutrients to aide recovery. The muscle cells, stimulated by a release of hormones, step up the reparative functions and grow stronger. Similar occurrences improve connective tissue and bone repair as well. Stretching and self massage efforts before and particularly after light recovery workouts are more productive when unencumbered by the tightness that would otherwise occur following hard workouts. In this way, your stretching efforts go further toward elongating connective tissue and helping tendons and ligaments heal and grow stronger. A good indication of when your structural system is recovered and ready for another hard workout is when the stiffness from the last hard workout is absent.

 

Self-massage, with the use of massage sticks and rollers, is one of the best methods to aide recovery after workouts. Manipulation of the muscles and tissues increases blood flow, breaks down muscle and connective tissue adhesions, and promotes adaptation of these tissues to withstand the rigors of your training as you progress toward your goals.

You will feel the fatigue and tension leave your body. When coupled with stretching and icing sore areas, these self-recovery techniques can make a very significant contribution to the adaptive process you seek, along with increased fitness.

 

Add that to some properly hydrated muscles and your recovery has just gained in effectiveness!

What is Addaday:  Scientifically-designed massage sticks, foam rollers, bodywork balls, and a flexible massage device called the Boomerang, all incorporate varied surface textures and shapes designed to release muscle and tendon adhesions, and provide a daily realignment of your joints.

#sosaddaday
#sosaddaday

 

Go to Top