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Bozzone makes it third win in a row with victory in Mexico

in ATHLETES/BLOGS/NEW ZEALAND/SOS PRO'S/TRIATHLON/USA by

So the final race of the 3-week assault has come to an end. With another successful result I have managed to claim my 3rd win in a row at Ironman 70.3 Campeche in Mexico. 

The past week was a tough one and included; a long travel day from Argentina, having to shift from freezing conditions to super hot conditions, managing my recovery in an effective way, managing my food intake along with a couple other issues that arose through the week without getting sick or run down.

I definitely prefer racing in warmer climates, Campeche was a cool town and had some interesting history with a small number of international tourists, And as I have experienced in other Mexican and South American races, the Latin American fans are some of the best in the world and this contributed to a memorable end to a pretty historic 15days of racing.

The race start was at the Campeche country club, which was a beautiful venue. Ruby Von Burg got a small gap in the swim and I shared the load with Kevin Collington trying to limit our deficit and do some damage on some of the stronger bike/runners in the field.

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Off onto the undulating bike course I soon bridged across to Ruby at the front of the race and at Km 25 when I could see the rest of the fields time gaps I decided that a little bit more heat needed to be added. I soon found myself navigating the remainder of the bike solo. Michael Weiss of Austria who likes the heat and puts together great races in Mexico was 3minutes back with the final 30km and he would work to close this to 2 minutes coming off the bike. 

The spring in the step was not quite there and somewhat to be expected. I was hoping that it was going to be a scorcher but it was not as hot as predicted and the pace had to be a little quicker. I seemed to manage my pace well through to 10miles and the gap to Weiss had bounced between 2 minutes and 1.5minutes. My legs were still coping okay and I managed to enjoy the final 2 miles home before breaking the tape for my 3rd win over 3 weekends.

With a bit of free time this past week I accumulated some of my past results and this was a record Half Ironman victory number 32 (Ironman 70.3 number 27).

Next up – a few easy weeks and some time with the family. I am off to Kona for a couple days for an Aquasphere photoshoot and I am looking forward to visiting the island and soaking up some of the spiritual energy before the rest of the season continues…

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Second win in two weeks as Bozzone takes 70.3 victory in Argentina

in BLOGS/NEW ZEALAND/SOS PRO'S/TRIATHLON/USA by

Fresh off his win at IRONMAN New Zealand, SOS athlete Terenzo Bozzone has taken another victory – this time over the 70.3 distance in Argentina.

That was tough! Ironman 70.3 Bariloche in Argentina brought on the hardest of conditions with the start being in 7-degree air temperature and course being relentless throughout the bike and run. I was very happy to run into the town square in 1st place and absorb all the crowds’ energy, absolutely amazing!

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It has been sometime since I have competed in a cold race and it caught me way off guard. I was roaming around the other pro athletes collecting all the extra gear I could gather for race day, top this off with a hyperthermia blanket underneath my race suit and in my sidi cycling shoes and I was about right for the race.

The backdrop for the swim was incredible with the Andes mountain range across the lake. Out of the water there were 5 of us including – Igor Amoreli, TJ Tolakson, Jarred Shoemaker, Daniel Fontana and myself and the race was on to see who could get their arm warmers, gloves and extras on the fastest. This did allow for the group to split up and soon I was at the front of the race pushing the pace through the initial 20km section that included a lot of climbing and technical descents on wet roads. By 30km Igor and Kennet from the US bridged across and unfortunately TJ and the rest of the field were stuck in no mans land and isolated, all riding individually.

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The legs were okay but I definitely still had a little residual fatigue in the tank from Ironman NZ, along with the cold weather the body was just not responding like I would have liked but I was getting through it just fine. The real test would be when we started the run…

Thankfully as I kicked out of T2 I still had a spring in my step and managed to gap the other 2. It was a hard course to find any rhythm with either head wind or tail wind and not many flat sections. The crowds through town were very motivational and I grew my lead to 4minutes by the finish. Igor rolled in 2nd and Kennett in 3rd place.

I have a long trip across to Campeche, Mexico but I am definitely looking forward to some warmer climates with the forecast for next weekend to be around 36 degrees Celsius… HAHA.

Get the STARTER PACK and try SOS for yourself 

 

Terenzo Bozzone Wins 2018 IRONMAN NZ

in ATHLETES/BLOGS/NEW ZEALAND/SOS PRO'S/TRIATHLON/USA by

Ironman New Zealand – What a day.

Written by Terenzo Bozzone (PC: IronmanNZ)

My 10th time toeing the start line down here in Taupo and I was very excited for the race. I had clear objectives of what I wanted to achieve out there, but the main excitement came from my brother Dino tackling his first Ironman.  All the pre race talk was about him and his race and my race preparation was secondary.

After a long 7-week off-season at the end of the 2017, I finally got back into training in the middle of January and with the short build up in to this race I wasn’t so sure what to expect out there. Tackling a race where I’ve had 10 years of experiences ‘not winning’ I had learned a lot and entered with a lot more patience.

The swim felt terrible, I couldn’t wait for it to be over. I was so near my limit that poor Guy Crawford’s feet are probably cut up from me swimming so close to him for the entire 3.8km trying not to fall off the pace. Onto the bike, slowly my body warmed up and my legs came to the party. We had the largest group ever in this race and soon all the big hitters had bridged across including Cam Brown and Joe Skipper who I was not so keen to start the marathon with.

By the start of lap 2 a small group of 4 had broken away and we were working well. With 40km to go it was just Skipper and myself at the front pushing to grow the gap on the chasers. In the final 1km my race almost took a turn for the worse when a car turned and cut me off. I must say I was pretty impressed with my bike handling to swerve, slow down enough and save my race and a bad accident. All that training on Auckland roads was paying off!!!

Heading out into the marathon my legs felt good… I tested to see where Joe Skipper’s legs were by running the first couple km’s pretty quick, My lead started to extent quickly, but with this being Ironman who knew what awaited me around the next corner. I absorbed all the energy I could from the crowds, the spectators, the volunteers and the other athletes on the course. Alternating water and SOS at one aide station and Water and a Clif Shot at the next helped keep the energy up and stay hydrated. Heading into lap 3 (the last 14km) of the run I was using the rabbits up the road on their first lap to keep my head in the game. The closest was Dino… with his prescribed race plan of running 5minutes per kilometer I was going to catch him in no time. I think he had more interest in holding me off as long as he could, as the closing of the gap took a lot longer than anticipated. It was an amazing feeling running along side him for a kilometer as he was killing it out there. I gave him a few pointers and he gave me a second wind to get home in a new course record of 7:59:57 . 5 minutes in front of skipper and another couple in front of race legend Cameron Brown.

It felt so sweet to break the tape for the first time here at Ironman NZ and having Dino go 10hr23minutes was the icing on the cake. Hopefully he has caught the bug and we will see him at a few more races…

Off to Argentina later in the week for Bariloche 70.3 then up to Campeche 70.3 in Mexico before taking a few weeks down time. 

The hydration of choice for Terenzo Bozzone.

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Which sporting event has the most extreme energy expenditure?

in BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING/TRIATHLON/Ultra-marathoning/USA by

Written By Asker Jeukendrup for mysportscience.com
Follow Asker on Twitter @Jeukendrup

It is often said that the Tour de France is perhaps the most gruelling endurance event on the planet. The same is sometimes said about Ironman. We saw in my previous blog that energy expenditure in the Tour de France averages almost 6000 kcal per day for 3 weeks (5).  It has been measured that energy expenditure can be as high as 9000 kcal per day. How does this compare to other sports? Is this really the most extreme sport? Is it Ironman… Or is there another event?

In the literature we can find energy expenditure values for a number of events and I have tried to find the highest values for energy expenditure in the literature. If someone knows of other papers that report extreme values please let me know and I will update this list.

There is a report of a male distance runner covering ∼100 km/day for 1,000 km (1), He averaged around 6,000 kcal/day.

Another report describes 2 elite cyclists averaging around 330 km/day for 10 days and expending 7,000 kcal per day (2)

There is also a report of a team of elite cyclists expending 6,500 kcal/day who covered nearly 4,900 km in 6 days during the Race across America (RAAM) (3).

Similar values were also reported in cross country skiers during intense training (6,000 kcal/day) (6).

Dr Mike Stroud, a Polar explorer and researcher, measured energy expenditure in man-haulers over several polar expeditions during the 1980s and 1990s (7). Before these studies the very high energy costs of polar travel on foot appreciated. During a modern-day, one-way expedition to the South Pole that repeated Scott’s route (“Footsteps of Scott expedition”), an average of 6,000 kcal were expended every 24 h. Mike Stroud himself together with Sir Ranulph Fiennes crossed Antarctica by foot and expended on average nearly 7,000 kcal/day.

During this crossing there was a period of approximately 10 days, while ascending to the plateau, during which they averaged nearly 11,000 kcal/day).

A recent study by Dr Brent Ruby and Colleagues (4) compared measurements at Ironman Hawaii (2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike and 26 mile run (3.8km; 180km and 42km respectively) and the Western State 100 (a 100 mile (160km) ultramarathon). Energy expenditure during the Hawaii Ironman averaged 9,040 kcal (plus or minus 1,390 kcal). In the Western State energy expenditure was as high as 16,310 kcal (plus or minus 2,960) but of course the duration of this event was more than 24 hours on average (26.8h).

It is clear that daily energy expenditure can be much higher than the reported average of 6000 kcal per day for the Tour de France cyclist. Values can be even higher than the extreme values reported during the longest and hardest days in the Tour.

What make the Tour de France unique though is that these extreme energy expenditures are achieved within 4-6 hours of racing per day and also that this is sustained over a period of 3 weeks.

Most other sports with extreme energy expenditures achieve their high numbers by exercising more hours per day at a lower intensity and sometimes by eliminating sleep.

Which is the most extreme sport? Difficult to say… would you rather do a day in the Tour than a day crossing Antartica, or running a 100 mile race in the heat without sleeping?

 

References 

1. Eden B, Abernethy P. Nutritional intake during an ultraendurance running race. International J Sports Nutr 4: 166–174, 1994.
2. Gabel K, Aldous A, Edgington C. Dietary intake of two elite male cyclists during 10-day, 2,050-mile ride. Int J Sports Nutr 5: 56–61, 1995.
3. Hulton A, Lahart I, Williams K, Godfrey R, Charlesworth S, Wilson M, Pedlar C, Whyte G. Energy expenditure in the race across america (RAAM). Int J Sports Med 31: 463–467, 2010.
4. Ruby BC, Cuddy JS, Hailes WS, Dumke CL, Slivka DR, Shriver TC, Schoeller DA Extreme endurance and the metabolic range of sustained activity is uniquely available for every human not just the elite few. Comparative Exercise Physiology, 11(1): 1-7, 2015.
5. Saris WH, van Erp-Baart MA, Brouns F, Westerterp KR, ten Hoor F. Study on food intake and energy expenditure during extreme sustained exercise: the Tour de France. Int J Sports Med;10 Suppl 1:S26-31, 1989
6. Sjodin A, Andersson A, Hogberg J, Westerterp KR. Energy balance in cross-country skiers: a study using doubly labeled water. Med Sci Sports Exercise 26: 720–724, 1994.
7. Stroud M, Coward W, Sawyer M. Measurements of energy expenditure using iso- tope-labelled water (2H218O) during an Arctic expedition. Eur J Appl Physiol 67: 375– 379, 1993

Focus on Sleep and Recovery: Road To Kona with Sarah Piampiano

in Uncategorized by

I want to win the Ironman World Championships. That’s what I’ve wanted since the day I started doing this sport. That’s what I work towards every single day.

 

Road To Kona: Nutrition with Sarah Piampiano

in ATHLETES/BLOGS/SOS PRO'S/TRIATHLON by

Follow professional Ironman Triathlete Sarah Piampiano on her journey to Kona.

In this video, Sarah takes us behind the scenes of how she plans and executes her nutrition plan, and explains why it her changes have been so important.

Trust the process… Trust the plan. 

The drinkable IV, SOS Recovery Hydration, has arrived

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

The drinkable IV, SOS Recovery Hydration, has arrived

 

SOS is excited to announce the release of the highly anticipated new addition; the Mango flavoured “Recovery Hydration” formula.

 

Dehydration isn’t just for the sports field, it’s a round the clock issue, and is the number one cause of daytime fatigue. Within sleek metallic black packaging, the new recovery specific hydration is as effective as an IV Drip for combatting mild to moderate dehydration.

 

The new formula is in response to demands from our consumers who want something that can tackle dehydration during the daily grind. Be it recovering from an evenings excess*, to staying hydrated from a long day in the office.

 

SOS Recovery Hydration has been formulated by Co-Founder Blanca Lizaola MD., through applying proven medical and sports science to tackle dehydration fast. Containing the correct balance of electrolytes, no artificial additives and utilising Cane Sugar with only 10 calories per stick, SOS helps you absorb three times more water than water alone.

 

CEO and Co-Founder James Mayo is ecstatic about the long-awaited arrival of the Recovery formula: “over the past four months we identified that our consumers and athletes daily state of dehydration was a key factor in maintaining a fully functioning body. People were hydrating for a workout but did not treat their bodies the same way when out socializing. The key factor was to develop a fruitier product with the same IV capabilities that satisfies people’s demands to work hard and play harder.  We call it “Lifestyle Survival”.

 

About SOS:

 

Founded in 2013, SOS is a doctor formulated hydration drink. SOS is based on the proven science of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Oral Rehydration Guidelines, as well as the American College of Sports Medicine research on dehydration.

New SOS recovery hydration 20ct box
New SOS recovery hydration 20ct box

 

SOS is free of artificial additives, has 3x the electrolytes of the average sports drink with just 1/6 the sugar. When mixed with water an SOS helps the body to absorb 3x more water than from water alone.

 

* SOS does not in any way support or encourage underage, excessive, or irresponsible drinking.

 

James Mayo, CEO & Co-Founder

James is as former professional athlete and Army Veteran.

 

Blanca Lizaola MD, Chief Medical Officer & Co-Founder

Dr Blanca is a qualified medical doctor with a specialty in Internal Medicine and a passionate focus on GI.

 

Website: www.INEEDSOS.com

Contact: info@sosrehydrate.com

Social Media: @sosrehydrate

#recoveryhydration

 

Knowing your hydration status

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

Knowing your hydration status is key to performing at your peak.

The great news is that it isn’t rocket science.  SOS founder Dr Blanca gives us some top tips

SOS Rehydrate

Knowing your hydration status

There is no rule of thumb when it comes to hydration. Everybody is different and has different needs. Learn to listen to your body.

The best way to assess your hydration status is through your urine.

1 – Understand that when you are hydrated you should be urinating a similar volume to what you are drinking.

2 – Urine color: by urinating light clear urine you will know that you are properly hydrated. Dark, orange and small amount of urine reflects dehydration.

 

Are you a salty sweater?

Not everybody needs to consume the same amount of sodium. There are some signs that can help you realize how much of a sodium sweater are you:

  1. a) Muscle cramps: sodium, chloride and potassium are the main electrolytes involved in muscle contraction. When any of these electrolytes are low or when there is not enough muscle perfusion due to dehydration the muscle contractility process will be impaired.
  2. b) After drying, your clothes will have white lines on your clothes
  3. c) When getting sweat in your eyes they will burn or even your sweat will taste salty

Dehydration affects performance

Next time you need hydrating remember these easy steps and hydrate accordingly.

To learn more about the science of SOS check out our science page www.sosrehydrate.com

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