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marathon hydration

Forget the post workout ice bath – study suggests hot water, instead

in BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING by

Written by Alex Hutchinson for The Globe and Mail 

The epitome of the hard-core, no-pain-no-gain approach to training is the post-workout ice bath. After pushing your muscles to their limits, you soak them in teeth-chatteringly cold water to speed their recovery before the next gruelling workout.

But there may be a gentler, more soothing path to greatness.

A recent study in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports suggests that swapping the ice tub for a relaxing soak in a hot bath can trigger performance-boosting adaptations that mimic how the body adjusts to hot weather. That is particularly valuable for those training through cold conditions – a Canadian winter, say – for a springtime race where the weather can be unexpectedly hot.

Better yet, hot baths actually feel good, points out Neil Walsh, director of the Extremes Research Group at the Bangor University in Wales and the senior author of the new study. “A hot soak is comfortable for aching limbs,” he says, “and there are other supposed health benefits – think Roman spas.”

Walsh’s interest in the topic dates back to his days as a competitive road cyclist. “I’d always taken a hot bath after a long training ride, and it didn’t make sense to me as a physiologist why a cold bath would be helpful.”

The idea that hot baths, beyond being pleasant, might actually boost performance stems from recent research into heat adaptation. After one to two weeks of exercising in hot conditions, your core temperature will drop, your sweat rate will increase and you will produce a greater volume of blood plasma, all of which will enhance your ability to perform in the heat.

A controversial 2010 study from researchers at the University of Oregon suggested that the same process of heat adaptation could also enhance endurance in cool conditions. This idea remains hotly contested (it was the topic of a debate in the Journal of Physiology last month), but the study spurred interest in more convenient ways of triggering heat adaptation.

An Australian study last year found that four days of 30-minute postrun saunas at 87 C produced a large increase in plasma volume.

It’s important to replace the fluids you lose during heat adaptation. SOS works just as rapidly as an IV Drip. Try it here today 

Still, not everyone has easy access to a heat-controlled treadmill or a sauna, so Walsh and his colleagues wondered whether a simple hot bath could provide some of the same benefits. They recruited 17 volunteers to run for 40 minutes on a treadmill for six consecutive days, followed each time by a 40-minute bath submerged to the neck. Ten of the volunteers were assigned to hot baths at 40 C, while the other seven took “thermoneutral” baths at 34 C.

By the end of the study, the hot-bath group had a lower resting rectal temperature by an average of 0.27 C, their temperature stayed lower during exercise and they began sweating sooner. Their performance in a five-kilometre treadmill trial improved by 5 per cent in hot conditions (33 C), though it didn’t change in cool conditions (18 C).

These are compelling results – but it’s worth nothing that the baths were pretty intense. On the first day, Walsh says, only four of the 10 hot-bath volunteers were able to complete 40 minutes, though nine of the 10 were able to complete it by the fifth day of adaptation. He and his colleagues hope to test less-onerous protocols in future studies: “As little as 20 minutes in the hot bath may be necessary to provide heat acclimation,” he says, but “this needs confirmation.”

So, will hot baths replace cold baths as the default postworkout soak? That depends on who you are, physiologist Trent Stellingwerff points out. Olympic endurance athletes such as those he works with at the Canadian Sport Institute Pacific in Victoria already have extremely high blood-plasma volumes, so hot baths may not provide enough of a stimulus to make any difference. Non-elite athletes, in contrast, might see a bigger benefit.

For now, there are few firm conclusions to be drawn. But if you are training through the winter for an event with potentially warm weather, a few hot baths seem like a low-risk insurance policy.

“I definitely felt the heat when I ran the Ottawa Marathon [in late May] in 2009,” Guelph-based marathoner Reid Coolsaet recalls. “It wasn’t even that hot, but I wasn’t used to it at all.”

Coolsaet plans to use a steam sauna to help him prepare for the expected heat of the Olympics in Brazil this year, though the late-summer timing of the Games means that he will not need much help getting used to muggy conditions. “Luckily,” he says drily, “the weather in Guelph in July and August is comparable to that in Rio.”

If you do decide to try hot baths this winter, bear in mind that heat puts additional stress on the body. For starters, stick to 10 minutes at no more than 40 C (a standard upper limit for hot tubs), and get out immediately if you feel dizzy or nauseous.

LetsGetRunning.co.uk Podcast with SOS CEO James Mayo

in BLOGS/INTERVIEWS/RUNNING/TRAINING/UK/USA by

On this episode Shaun and Jermaine chat Running Hydration with former international athlete and founder of SOS rehydrate, James Mayo.

We discuss hydration myths, tips and tricks and discuss the story behind SOS Rehydrate; how one too many bottles of red wine got James, his wife Blanca, and his brother Tom thinking…

WATCH: Hydration For Runners

in ATHLETES/BLOGS/RUNNING by

About Elizabeth

An NCAA Division 1 distance swimmer and water polo player, Elizabeth transitioned into triathlon after college and is a multiple podium finisher at the Olympic and 70.3 race distance and a USAT National Qualifier at the Olympic distance.

Elizabeth has an undergraduate degree in Humanities from UCSB, an MA Education in Health Sciences and a CA Teaching Credential in Health Sciences and History.  In addition, she is a certified sports nutritionist from the ISSN (International Society of Sports Nutrition).

Fuel For A Faster Marathon

in ATHLETES/BLOGS/RUNNING/SOS PRO'S by

The final 10km of a marathon can be a world of hurt. Make it easier on yourself with a fuelling strategy.

Performance in a marathon is about controlling the controllable. Train hard, recover well and the variables associated with fitness are minimised. Practice pace judgement and the likelihood that you reach your goal begins to increase. Fuel properly and you maximise the chances of avoiding ‘the wall’ or the myriad of other names associated with struggling through the last 10-12km.

Fuelling is a strategy of supplementing the bodies diminishing glycogen stores throughout long distance racing. There are two sides to the coin of fuelling: hydration and carbohydrates. The key is maximising the bodies ability to utilise both, so absorption and availability is king.

The general consensus in the scientific community is that the body generally has enough glycogen ‘on board’ to get you to around 75-90 minutes of hard running. However, by implementing an effective hydration and carbohydrate protocol, gains can be anywhere from 2-15% based on where you’re racing.

When it comes to fuelling for the marathon there is plenty of conflicting information floating around, yet there are a few in the scientific community that (a) specialise in this area (b) are runners themselves and work with elites, and finally (c) can communicate this information clearly and concisely. One of the few to be (d) all of the above, is Trent Stellingwerff.

Stellingwerff provides physiology and nutrition expertise to Canada’s national rowing, track & field and triathlon teams, as well as leading their Innovation and Research division. He is currently one of the leading-brains in the field, and below we have implemented some of his recommendations into a “how to” guide for fuelling with SOS for any race where you’re likely to be on your feet for longer than those 70-90 minutes.

SOS athlete Patrick Rizzo finishing the London Marathon in 12th place. April, 2013. Rizzo has found that without effective fuelling he is unable to get the most out of his fitness and regularly practices taking on fluids in training.

Where does SOS fit? 

SOS is an Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) and one of the most effective ways to absorb electrolytes outside of an IV Drip, which would be difficult to utilise while racing…

What about the Carbohydrate? 

For the purpose of this analysis we will look at the personal favourite of some of the SOS marathoners: gels. Gels are widely available and are easy to carry on the run or dissolve in water. They’re also available at most major marathons and trail races.

Getting Started 

Although there are some useful ‘general guidelines’, we all have different needs, so it’s always a good idea to complete a bit of an amateur sweat test during training. It is as simple as it sounds: track your weight pre and post run. The metric system makes this a lot easier as 1L of sweat is equal to 1 Kg of body weight. Ideally you will end up somewhere between the 2-5% range. That will give you an idea of how much fluid you will need to get down to keep the tank running. Try it across varying types of weather and distances to get a bit of an idea of how your body is working to keep itself cool.

Laura Thweatt successfully implemented her favourite Mango SOS as a key part of her fuelling for the NYC Marathon in 2015 where she was 1st American.

What type of fuel? 

Gels compliment hydration via SOS pretty well. However, not all gels are created equal, and neither are all sugars. Stellingwerff recommends a blend of glucose and fructose, with studies indicating that this allows between 20-40% greater absorption and delivery of carbohydrate over glucose alone. This is because there are separate transporters for glucose and fructose in the intestine, meaning that a glucose/fructose blend of around 2:1 results in increased uptake of carbohydrate and more delivery to the muscles.

Various brands of gels offer a wide range of consistency and viscosity that is all a matter of personal preference. What is important is the glucose/fructose ratio. Look for maltodextrin (which is glucose as well) or sucrose and fructose as the first two ingredients.

The Rule of 15 

The ‘Rule of 15’ is basically consuming something close to 15 grams of carbohydrate every 15 minutes and 150 mL of fluid. Don’t overthink the exact numbers, the key is being there or there about over the course of an hour (ish), which is around 60g per hour of carb’s and 600 mL of fluids.

In order to limit GI distress and maximise absorption while also working to the guidelines above, we have found that it’s a good idea to separate your fuel and hydration. Rather using a generic sports drink that is trying to be both, alternate SOS and a gel at each available station. This way you can let your body focus on one thing at a time while still getting your fuel requirements.

Separating hydration also allows for a greater ability to modify consumption based on weather without sacrificing glycogen intake. If it’s hot, you can drink more and vice versa. Hydration needs can vary; glycogen requirements do not.

Take your time with your fluids; you don’t need to get your whole bottle down in 30 seconds. It’s not uncommon to see those at the top end of the field sipping over the course of a kilometre. It’s easier on the system and settles with less distress.

Practice makes perfect 

Running is fast can be hard, and drinking while running fast is even harder. With that in mind it’s important to practice your fluids in training as much as is feasibly possible. Set up a foldout table or put bottles on the hood of your car. If you’re carrying bottles, practice long runs and workouts with your fuel belt or bottle in hand. If you are leaving hydration purely up to what the race provides, try and get as efficient as you can with drinking out of paper cups.

Don’t let all the training you have done fall apart because of an inadequate fuelling strategy. You can be as fit as you have ever been, but if the pump from the engine to the tank isn’t working optimally you will almost certainly run below your ability.

When to take SOS by founders James & Tom

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

 

 

When to take SOS?

As we know hydration is vital, knowing when to take SOS will help you hydrate effectively and you compete to your potential.  Here are some tips from the two founders and runners James and Tom.

 

Those were the days ...
Those were the days …

BEFORE:

It is important to be hydrated before exercise or competition, hence it is vital to know your hydration/nutrition needs. To be reminded then check out http://sosrehydrate.com/knowing-hydration-status/

Know your sweat rate, work out conditions and hydrate accordingly. We suggest taking an SOS in a water bottle sipped about an hour before.

The great thing about SOS is that it gets absorbed super quickly meaning that it wont loiter in your stomach giving you a stitch later.

 

DURING:

During competition, depending on the intensity here are our suggestions:

 

Road, marathon and ultra runners:

Those running anything over 10km, then we suggest you pre mix some SOS in a bit of water as a concentrate to add to your drinks on route.

SOS is not suggested to be drank with gels as the excess sugar affects the absorption.  It’s ok to use as a rinse to get rid of the gloopy gel.  Keep 15 min either side of a gel for best possible absorption.  After all gels aren’t needed for events under 1hr of duration.

Have 1 SOS per few hours of running.  This will not only keep you hydrated, but will ward off leg cramps.  SOS helps absorb the water faster than water alone, then liquid wont be sloshing around your stomach, rather it will be set to work where its needed most.

 

Middle and long distance track:

The founders former events.  Those middle and long distance track runners haven’t got time and its not needed during the race but ensure you are hydrated before and especially after.

SOS 800m Track Classic
SOS 800m Track Classic 2014

Sprinters:

SOS is great between rounds. Citrate buffers lactic acid, sodium keeps you hydrated for longer, potassium and magnesium will aid muscle contraction and prevent fatigue.

 

Field eventers and jumpers:

Its hot out there in the middle of the track and you are getting dehydrated just sitting there waiting for your next round.  Take a bottle mixed with SOS to keep you hydrated throughout the competition.

 

POST:

As soon as competition has been completed then take an SOS with a water bottle.  This will replace lost electrolytes, the citrates will buffer the lactate and the magnesium will aid recovery.

SOS is based off proven medical and sports science, it provides what you need while you are running.

 

Where else are electrolyte drinks handy?

 

Flights:  Immobility, decreased air moisture are some of the factors that lead to dehydration and jetlag while flying. Drinking an SOS just before landing will hydrate you faster, aid recovery from jet lag and help you adapt to the environment quicker.

SOS flying

 

Stomach upset: Especially relevant when traveling abroad for competition. Nausea, vomit, diarrhea, bloating and stomach cramps will decrease performance. SOS’ formula activates a mechanism in your gut that absorbs water faster, hydrating you faster when you need it.

Hangovers:  You have completed your ambition, won your personal race and now its time to celebrate!  Alcohol dehydrates you and hangovers are mainly dehydration related.  Take an SOS before you end your nights celebrations to help get you back to normal.

Lifestyle survival

Is SOS Informed Sport ratified?

Yes

We are as anti drug as you are and want to ensure our athletes are safe from any banned substances creeping into our products.

SOS Rehydrate logo

What is SOS?

SOS was created by mixing James and Tom’s elite running experience with Blanca’s medical knowledge. Based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) standards and the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations, SOS provides the optimum amount of electrolytes with the fastest possible absorption capabilities for athletes.

www.sosrehydrate.com

Happy Running

James and Tom

 

Run Faster ..Reduce Sugar .. SOS Marathon Fueling

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

Run Faster .. Reduce Sugar .. SOS Marathon Fueling by marathon super coach Gaz @Getrunning

We recently caught up with Gaz at Getrunning who has taken hundreds of runners through their first (and subsequent) marathons to talk about his experience of using SOS during a race.

Get that SOS into you
SOS time!

Here are his top 5 tips:

 

  1. Train your body away from excess sugar. Many first time runners are very reliant on sugar as a key fuel to their normal diet, so when they first run for a long distance (60mins plus) many people crave sugar when in reality they should be able to run with less of it. You should be able to get to the 2.0 to 2.5 hour mark before you begin to seriously fuel. Our suggestion is to train the body away from using high sugar drink products. It does not feel great when you first begin to train without using sugar, but trust us, after 6 weeks or so you will notice how good you feel when you run and how moving away from excess sugar can help your running performance over time.
  1. What should I eat after 2.5-3hrs? We have seen the benefit of using prunes, bananas, oranges and dates at this time and using them every 40 mins or so. They are well digested and easy to take on board. Other fuels we have seen are sports Jubes, you can take on smaller amounts of sugar this way, but really you have to learn what fuel works for you. Don’t forget the more hydrated you are, the easier the fueling process becomes.
  1. Race preparation week? Get hydrated the week before and don’t just guzzle it the morning before. Drinking water in large volumes the day before the race wont make you run faster. We believe getting SOS into you the night before and in the week leading up until you are hydrated works very well. If you have hydrated consistently the week before, then the morning of the race you don’t need to over-hydrate – all the work has been done. Take sips of SOS for thirst but you should be fine if the week before has gone well. Nothing worse than finding the toilet on the start line!
  1. Race time? Sorry but many race courses do not provide great products for runners, too much sugar and often causing you to get back into the sugar cycle. Our athletes take SOS in a variety of ways 1) in a fuel belt diluted, 2) as a concentrate in a fuel belt and mix the concentrate with water at a station or 3) in longer races take the powder and mix on the go. Yes, it might not be the most time effective but trust me you will finish faster doing it this way – cramping may even cause you to stop and finish competing. Or if you are really lucky a race will be serving SOS on the course! Lots more races to come next year as well.
  1. Afterwards? It is all about recovery and getting hydrated. A good check is urine volume and colour and if you are smart enough to have weighed yourself before and afterwards then you will have a great gauge on how much sweat you have lost. Replace it 1:1 SOS for sweat loss.
  1. Finally good luck. If you have any questions about your experiences feel free to email us and we will talk you through your hydration plan. Email info@sosrehydrate.com. For Gaz at Getrunning see www.getrunning.co.nz.

And if your stocks are low get your SOS online now  Run Faster!!

Its all about the hydration
Its all about the hydration
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