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marathon running

Forget the post workout ice bath – study suggests hot water, instead

in BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING by

Written by Alex Hutchinson for The Globe and Mail 

The epitome of the hard-core, no-pain-no-gain approach to training is the post-workout ice bath. After pushing your muscles to their limits, you soak them in teeth-chatteringly cold water to speed their recovery before the next gruelling workout.

But there may be a gentler, more soothing path to greatness.

A recent study in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports suggests that swapping the ice tub for a relaxing soak in a hot bath can trigger performance-boosting adaptations that mimic how the body adjusts to hot weather. That is particularly valuable for those training through cold conditions – a Canadian winter, say – for a springtime race where the weather can be unexpectedly hot.

Better yet, hot baths actually feel good, points out Neil Walsh, director of the Extremes Research Group at the Bangor University in Wales and the senior author of the new study. “A hot soak is comfortable for aching limbs,” he says, “and there are other supposed health benefits – think Roman spas.”

Walsh’s interest in the topic dates back to his days as a competitive road cyclist. “I’d always taken a hot bath after a long training ride, and it didn’t make sense to me as a physiologist why a cold bath would be helpful.”

The idea that hot baths, beyond being pleasant, might actually boost performance stems from recent research into heat adaptation. After one to two weeks of exercising in hot conditions, your core temperature will drop, your sweat rate will increase and you will produce a greater volume of blood plasma, all of which will enhance your ability to perform in the heat.

A controversial 2010 study from researchers at the University of Oregon suggested that the same process of heat adaptation could also enhance endurance in cool conditions. This idea remains hotly contested (it was the topic of a debate in the Journal of Physiology last month), but the study spurred interest in more convenient ways of triggering heat adaptation.

An Australian study last year found that four days of 30-minute postrun saunas at 87 C produced a large increase in plasma volume.

It’s important to replace the fluids you lose during heat adaptation. SOS works just as rapidly as an IV Drip. Try it here today 

Still, not everyone has easy access to a heat-controlled treadmill or a sauna, so Walsh and his colleagues wondered whether a simple hot bath could provide some of the same benefits. They recruited 17 volunteers to run for 40 minutes on a treadmill for six consecutive days, followed each time by a 40-minute bath submerged to the neck. Ten of the volunteers were assigned to hot baths at 40 C, while the other seven took “thermoneutral” baths at 34 C.

By the end of the study, the hot-bath group had a lower resting rectal temperature by an average of 0.27 C, their temperature stayed lower during exercise and they began sweating sooner. Their performance in a five-kilometre treadmill trial improved by 5 per cent in hot conditions (33 C), though it didn’t change in cool conditions (18 C).

These are compelling results – but it’s worth nothing that the baths were pretty intense. On the first day, Walsh says, only four of the 10 hot-bath volunteers were able to complete 40 minutes, though nine of the 10 were able to complete it by the fifth day of adaptation. He and his colleagues hope to test less-onerous protocols in future studies: “As little as 20 minutes in the hot bath may be necessary to provide heat acclimation,” he says, but “this needs confirmation.”

So, will hot baths replace cold baths as the default postworkout soak? That depends on who you are, physiologist Trent Stellingwerff points out. Olympic endurance athletes such as those he works with at the Canadian Sport Institute Pacific in Victoria already have extremely high blood-plasma volumes, so hot baths may not provide enough of a stimulus to make any difference. Non-elite athletes, in contrast, might see a bigger benefit.

For now, there are few firm conclusions to be drawn. But if you are training through the winter for an event with potentially warm weather, a few hot baths seem like a low-risk insurance policy.

“I definitely felt the heat when I ran the Ottawa Marathon [in late May] in 2009,” Guelph-based marathoner Reid Coolsaet recalls. “It wasn’t even that hot, but I wasn’t used to it at all.”

Coolsaet plans to use a steam sauna to help him prepare for the expected heat of the Olympics in Brazil this year, though the late-summer timing of the Games means that he will not need much help getting used to muggy conditions. “Luckily,” he says drily, “the weather in Guelph in July and August is comparable to that in Rio.”

If you do decide to try hot baths this winter, bear in mind that heat puts additional stress on the body. For starters, stick to 10 minutes at no more than 40 C (a standard upper limit for hot tubs), and get out immediately if you feel dizzy or nauseous.

Hydration On The Run

in BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING by
Adapted from Matt Fitzgerald

Hydration during running is not as complicated as you may have been led to believe.

When you run, you sweat. The more you sweat, the more your blood volume decreases. The more your blood volume decreases, the harder your heart has to work to deliver oxygen to your working muscles.

Sounds dangerous, but it’s really not. Runners almost never experience dehydration levels sufficient to cause major health consequences. But normal levels of dehydration will make you feel uncomfortable and cause you to slow down.

Drinking while you run will limit these negative effects of dehydration. But what should you drink, how much, and when?

SOS can be compared to an IV drip. It works just as rapidly but is safer and cheaper at combating mild to moderate dehydration. Try it here

In the past, athletes were encouraged to drink as much as possible during exercise, or at least to drink enough to completely offset dehydration (that is, to drink enough to prevent any decrease in body weight during exercise). However, it is now understood that this is bad advice, for two reasons.

Firstly, it is possible to drink too much during exercise. Forcing yourself to swallow more fluid than your body really needs while running may cause gastrointestinal distress, and in extreme cases it can cause a dangerous condition known as water intoxication, or hyponatremia. Secondly, research has shown that drinking to completely offset sweating offers no advantage with respect to performance or body temperature regulation compared to drinking by thirst.

The new exercise hydration advice is in fact to drink according to your thirst. As long as you keep an adequate supply of a palatable drink accessible during your runs, you will naturally drink enough to optimize your performance if you just drink as often and as much as your thirst dictates.

Dehydration only affects performance in workouts lasting longer than an hour, so you don’t have to drink during workouts that are shorter than an hour. However, you can if you like.

SOS tops independent research trial for effective hydration

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

SOS subjects’ hydration status significantly improved in an independent research trial.

 

A combined independent study, led by Coventry University and Newman University, in the United Kingdom, analyzed the effectiveness of rehydration beverages following an interval training session in highly trained middle-distance runners.

 

SOS was compared against an electrolyte sports drink tablet (Nuun) and a placebo of flavoured water.

 

The results were resoundingly in SOS’s favour.

 

Within 12 hours of drinking SOS, the subjects had recovered their plasma volume and body mass completely.

 

When taking the electrolyte tablet, or flavoured water, neither plasma volume or the body mass of the subjects had recovered to pre work out levels, therefore increasing their risk of dehydration.

 

This study identifies that the subjects who used SOS hydrated faster and more effectively than those subjects who used other drinks.

 

See Fig 1. and 2.

 

What does this mean?

Simply put, taking SOS facilitates hydration and recovery better and faster than water or Nuun tablets.

 

In sports, hydration is critical. According to Gleeson et al., a loss of 2% body weight can lead to a 5% loss in performance over 10km and a 3% loss in performance over 800m / Mile. That could be the difference between a sub-4 minute mile or a 4:06 mile, a loss of 1 minute 45 seconds over 10km for a 35min target 10km, or the difference between winning and finishing out of the medals.

Fig1 Body Mass

Figure 1: Mean (±95% CI) percentage change in body mass. Placebo (PLA):6% chance of an unlikely benefit; SOS: 84% chance of a likely benefit and ESD (Nuun): 6% chance of an unlikely benefit (Hopkins, 2000).

 

Starting the day in a negative dehydration state will diminish recovery and quality of subsequent workouts. Dehydration can lead to headaches, tiredness, fatigue and potentially more serious complications.

 

 

 

Figure 2 Plasma Volume

Figure 2: Mean (± 95% CI) change in plasma volume. SOS: 81% chance of a likely benefit Vs. ESD; SOS: 96% chance of a very likely benefit Vs. Placebo and ESD (Nuun) 63% chance of a possible benefit Vs. PLA (Hopkins, 2000).

 

 

 

With proven scientific results, SOS should be in every runner’s bottle, whether to hydrate between rounds in competition, to use before, during and after a workout, or to help you stay hydrated for what everyday life throws at you.

 

SOS can be purchased from www.ineedsos.com

 

Marathon Fueling by Laura Thweatt – 1st American 2015 NYC Marathon

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by
Whilst the weather may be cooling off in US and Europe, many of us are starting to gear up for two iconic marathons – Boston and London – early in the spring of 2016.
Now is the time to sort out the training plan and buy the kit, but many a runner forgets one key ingredient: Electrolytes.  Yes we all know the marketing gimmick about the gels but its electrolytes that get you round.  After all when you sweat it’s not just water you loose, its sodium, potassium, chloride and magnesium.  If you don’t replace these and in the correct amounts, then your training and ultimately your race day will be adversely affected without you even knowing it.
SOS asked Laura Thweatt, the 1st American home in the 2015 NYC Marathon, to give us her lowdown on training and racing from a marathon fueling perspective.
Who's ready to run?!
Who’s ready to run?!
The Learning Cycle:
Going into my first marathon I knew very little in regards to the type of fueling needed to successfully complete 26.2. What I did know was that I did not want to find myself at mile 15 running straight into the dreaded “wall.” Having been a competitive runner for the last twelve years I understood that electrolyte drinks were a key component in hydrating pre race and rehydrating post race. As we sweat during a run or race we are loosing important minerals, such as sodium, that a few gulps of water cannot replace. During a marathon it is crucial that you are rehydrating and replenishing what you are loosing though sweat in two plus hours of exertion.
Why SOS:
My coach Lee Troop kept stressing the importance of getting fluids down during the race, and that the gels were there as back up just in case I was struggling to get down my drinks. SOS Rehydrate provided the perfect balance of sugars and sodium, two essential components in preventing the bonk by replenishing the body’s losses.
Practice makes perfect:
Long runs are a great way to practice fueling and thus finding out what works for you individually.
When and how much SOS did you drink:
I took 5 x 8floz (250ml) bottles of SOS one at 5k, 10k, 15k, 20k, 25k.
Favourite Flavour:
I used SOS Mango as my go to flavor in training as well as in my debut at NYC Marathon. Good luck to everyone out there training! May the force be with you 🙂
 Laura Thweatt electrolyte drink SOS
There you have it.  Marathon Fueling the simple way.  Thanks Laura and best of rehydrated luck for marathon number 2.
SOS wishes everyone safe, fun and rehydrated running.  May this in some small way help you achieve your goals.

When to take SOS by founders James & Tom

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

 

 

When to take SOS?

As we know hydration is vital, knowing when to take SOS will help you hydrate effectively and you compete to your potential.  Here are some tips from the two founders and runners James and Tom.

 

Those were the days ...
Those were the days …

BEFORE:

It is important to be hydrated before exercise or competition, hence it is vital to know your hydration/nutrition needs. To be reminded then check out http://sosrehydrate.com/knowing-hydration-status/

Know your sweat rate, work out conditions and hydrate accordingly. We suggest taking an SOS in a water bottle sipped about an hour before.

The great thing about SOS is that it gets absorbed super quickly meaning that it wont loiter in your stomach giving you a stitch later.

 

DURING:

During competition, depending on the intensity here are our suggestions:

 

Road, marathon and ultra runners:

Those running anything over 10km, then we suggest you pre mix some SOS in a bit of water as a concentrate to add to your drinks on route.

SOS is not suggested to be drank with gels as the excess sugar affects the absorption.  It’s ok to use as a rinse to get rid of the gloopy gel.  Keep 15 min either side of a gel for best possible absorption.  After all gels aren’t needed for events under 1hr of duration.

Have 1 SOS per few hours of running.  This will not only keep you hydrated, but will ward off leg cramps.  SOS helps absorb the water faster than water alone, then liquid wont be sloshing around your stomach, rather it will be set to work where its needed most.

 

Middle and long distance track:

The founders former events.  Those middle and long distance track runners haven’t got time and its not needed during the race but ensure you are hydrated before and especially after.

SOS 800m Track Classic
SOS 800m Track Classic 2014

Sprinters:

SOS is great between rounds. Citrate buffers lactic acid, sodium keeps you hydrated for longer, potassium and magnesium will aid muscle contraction and prevent fatigue.

 

Field eventers and jumpers:

Its hot out there in the middle of the track and you are getting dehydrated just sitting there waiting for your next round.  Take a bottle mixed with SOS to keep you hydrated throughout the competition.

 

POST:

As soon as competition has been completed then take an SOS with a water bottle.  This will replace lost electrolytes, the citrates will buffer the lactate and the magnesium will aid recovery.

SOS is based off proven medical and sports science, it provides what you need while you are running.

 

Where else are electrolyte drinks handy?

 

Flights:  Immobility, decreased air moisture are some of the factors that lead to dehydration and jetlag while flying. Drinking an SOS just before landing will hydrate you faster, aid recovery from jet lag and help you adapt to the environment quicker.

SOS flying

 

Stomach upset: Especially relevant when traveling abroad for competition. Nausea, vomit, diarrhea, bloating and stomach cramps will decrease performance. SOS’ formula activates a mechanism in your gut that absorbs water faster, hydrating you faster when you need it.

Hangovers:  You have completed your ambition, won your personal race and now its time to celebrate!  Alcohol dehydrates you and hangovers are mainly dehydration related.  Take an SOS before you end your nights celebrations to help get you back to normal.

Lifestyle survival

Is SOS Informed Sport ratified?

Yes

We are as anti drug as you are and want to ensure our athletes are safe from any banned substances creeping into our products.

SOS Rehydrate logo

What is SOS?

SOS was created by mixing James and Tom’s elite running experience with Blanca’s medical knowledge. Based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) standards and the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations, SOS provides the optimum amount of electrolytes with the fastest possible absorption capabilities for athletes.

www.sosrehydrate.com

Happy Running

James and Tom

 

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