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rehydration

Hydration On The Run

in BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING by
Adapted from Matt Fitzgerald

Hydration during running is not as complicated as you may have been led to believe.

When you run, you sweat. The more you sweat, the more your blood volume decreases. The more your blood volume decreases, the harder your heart has to work to deliver oxygen to your working muscles.

Sounds dangerous, but it’s really not. Runners almost never experience dehydration levels sufficient to cause major health consequences. But normal levels of dehydration will make you feel uncomfortable and cause you to slow down.

Drinking while you run will limit these negative effects of dehydration. But what should you drink, how much, and when?

SOS can be compared to an IV drip. It works just as rapidly but is safer and cheaper at combating mild to moderate dehydration. Try it here

In the past, athletes were encouraged to drink as much as possible during exercise, or at least to drink enough to completely offset dehydration (that is, to drink enough to prevent any decrease in body weight during exercise). However, it is now understood that this is bad advice, for two reasons.

Firstly, it is possible to drink too much during exercise. Forcing yourself to swallow more fluid than your body really needs while running may cause gastrointestinal distress, and in extreme cases it can cause a dangerous condition known as water intoxication, or hyponatremia. Secondly, research has shown that drinking to completely offset sweating offers no advantage with respect to performance or body temperature regulation compared to drinking by thirst.

The new exercise hydration advice is in fact to drink according to your thirst. As long as you keep an adequate supply of a palatable drink accessible during your runs, you will naturally drink enough to optimize your performance if you just drink as often and as much as your thirst dictates.

Dehydration only affects performance in workouts lasting longer than an hour, so you don’t have to drink during workouts that are shorter than an hour. However, you can if you like.

RUNNING AROUND THE HOLIDAYS

in LIFESTYLE/RUNNING/SOS MAGAZINE/TRAINING/USA by

It’s that time of year… Christmas, New Years… all that good stuff. Holiday’s are great, except they create some unique challenges when it comes to training.
Runners are creatures of habit; we create routines for ourselves to manage stress and   stay on top of all the variables associated with training. Basically, runners build their own micro ecosystem.

If there is one thing that can disrupt that ecosystem, its travel – which is why you will regularly see runners’ hotel rooms looking like a workout room. The bare necessities for normal humans are a suitcase and a bathing suit. For the runner it’s a foam roller, stretching rope, lacrosse ball, theraband… the list goes on.

Chances are this holiday season you will be travelling, and that your family will still never be able to comprehend why you are “going for a run”, or why you can’t just “fit it in” some other time. Then there is trying to explain why you are so tired all the time, and telling Nana as politely as possible that you already eat a lot and don’t need “fattening up”. Add to that the fact that you’re likely going to be either sharing a room with three other relatives or sleeping on the sofa. Last but not least you’re probably going to be in a place that you don’t do a lot of training in. There is no 4 mile loop that you can shut your mind off on and just lap a couple of times, or your trusty favourite workout spot.ssrun5

Just like exam time during University, the above is all added yet underrated stress on the body. Runners are constantly dancing around and across a very thin red line of peak fitness or injury and illness, and it often only takes a few new variables for the scales to quickly tip. With this in mind, we have put together some simple yet effective tips to help you manage training during the holiday season.

For those lucky enough to be runners in America, annual leave virtually does not exist, so chances are you will be back home in about two or three days.

 

PLAN AHEAD

Sounds simple, yet it is one of the easiest things to forget about. It often feels like Christmas is the day after Thanksgiving, and you go from your Turkey Trot to having lunch next to that weird Uncle who still wants to teach you how to wrestle.

Finding good training spots in new areas is now more accessible than it has ever been, particularly with the rise in popularity of applications like Strava. Look for some popular loops, parks or paths and plan your training accordingly. The data will give you a good sense of where you can run fast, and where you can run without dealing with traffic or a lot of people. University campuses are usually a pretty good starting point, as even if you are in the middle of the town where they made ‘The Hills Have Eyes’ you will probably find a track or some bike paths to run on.

 

GET GOOD AT RUNNING LAPS

There is no point taking any risks while you are running in a new area. By that I mean if you find a decent little park or grassed field somewhere, run it to death. There is nothing worse than trying to do a recovery run and also figure out where the hell you are: stopping and starting, looking down at your phone and trying to navigate out of iTunes and into Google maps. If Bowerman TC can do a 15 mile run on Ronaldo field at Nike WHQ (which is 3 laps to the mile) then you can run around a shitty high school football field for an hour.

 

GET A TRIAL GYM MEMBERSHIP

24hr gyms are everywhere, and they all offer free-trials for a couple of visits. Set one up in advance and head there before and/or after runs. That way you can get into your tights and lay around on the floor with your various shaped balls and stretching ropes without your family thinking that you’re some kind of burlesque performer.

By heading to a gym you can dedicate all the time you need to pre-hab and re-hab and not need to worry about any running-related activities while back at the house. Not only is this easier logistically, its also a lot less stressful as there isn’t any chance you can be made to feel bad for doing your bum exercises while Nana is fisting the turkey with stuffing and everyone else is pottering about the kitchen.

 

REGULATE NOISE & LIGHT

It is perfectly acceptable for people aged 50 or over to fall asleep absolutely anywhere, yet runners often have the energy and motivation levels of the elderly. The advantage Grandad has is that he can turn his hearing aid off and instantly be in nap-heaven.

If you are not lucky enough to require the use of a hearing aid yet, buy some earplugs from the supermarket. If you are a seasoned traveller you will likely have some noise cancelling headphones. Add to this a sleep mask and you have a ripping day-time sleep set up that signals your intentions for a nap and will make people feel bad about trying to wake you. If you can add to this a feet-up situation that involves a blanket and/or a pillow you will have successfully mastered the task.

Target your most important daytime sleeps for after meals when there is a higher likelihood of your family doing the same after they have eaten themselves halfway towards diabetes.

 

MINUTES NOT MILES

Once again, sounds simple, but it can be a huge help. Don’t worry about pace or distance. If you normally cover about 10 miles for a 70 minute run at home but are now somewhere where you are still not quite settled, just do 70 minutes rather than trying to hit an exact pace or distance.

GPS watches are a great tool but can often be more harmful than helpful. Don’t try and force the pace and distance of a run you know inside out back home in an area where you aren’t as comfortable.

 

TAKE A DAY OFF

Getting fit is about a balance between stress and rest. Chances are you will probably be going to sleep later and up earlier than you normally would be. Being surrounded by people every minute of the day can often leave you feeling a bit drained from being ‘on’ so much.

Play it safe and schedule a day off during the week so you can enjoy a lunchtime beer and kick back like a normal person for 12 hours. This will help to restore your reputation as something more than the fanatical ‘exerciser’ in the family.

Toeing the party line like this for a day may cause temporary insanity, given it will be a consistent recycling pattern of sitting, eating and the same stories over and over and over. Still, it will be good for the body and is also a great chance to bank some emotional capital that you will need for leaving early during the opening of presents for your tempo.

 

Enjoy the Holiday’s, and don’t forget to hydrate!

 

 

SOS tops independent research trial for effective hydration

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

SOS subjects’ hydration status significantly improved in an independent research trial.

 

A combined independent study, led by Coventry University and Newman University, in the United Kingdom, analyzed the effectiveness of rehydration beverages following an interval training session in highly trained middle-distance runners.

 

SOS was compared against an electrolyte sports drink tablet (Nuun) and a placebo of flavoured water.

 

The results were resoundingly in SOS’s favour.

 

Within 12 hours of drinking SOS, the subjects had recovered their plasma volume and body mass completely.

 

When taking the electrolyte tablet, or flavoured water, neither plasma volume or the body mass of the subjects had recovered to pre work out levels, therefore increasing their risk of dehydration.

 

This study identifies that the subjects who used SOS hydrated faster and more effectively than those subjects who used other drinks.

 

See Fig 1. and 2.

 

What does this mean?

Simply put, taking SOS facilitates hydration and recovery better and faster than water or Nuun tablets.

 

In sports, hydration is critical. According to Gleeson et al., a loss of 2% body weight can lead to a 5% loss in performance over 10km and a 3% loss in performance over 800m / Mile. That could be the difference between a sub-4 minute mile or a 4:06 mile, a loss of 1 minute 45 seconds over 10km for a 35min target 10km, or the difference between winning and finishing out of the medals.

Fig1 Body Mass

Figure 1: Mean (±95% CI) percentage change in body mass. Placebo (PLA):6% chance of an unlikely benefit; SOS: 84% chance of a likely benefit and ESD (Nuun): 6% chance of an unlikely benefit (Hopkins, 2000).

 

Starting the day in a negative dehydration state will diminish recovery and quality of subsequent workouts. Dehydration can lead to headaches, tiredness, fatigue and potentially more serious complications.

 

 

 

Figure 2 Plasma Volume

Figure 2: Mean (± 95% CI) change in plasma volume. SOS: 81% chance of a likely benefit Vs. ESD; SOS: 96% chance of a very likely benefit Vs. Placebo and ESD (Nuun) 63% chance of a possible benefit Vs. PLA (Hopkins, 2000).

 

 

 

With proven scientific results, SOS should be in every runner’s bottle, whether to hydrate between rounds in competition, to use before, during and after a workout, or to help you stay hydrated for what everyday life throws at you.

 

SOS can be purchased from www.ineedsos.com

 

When to take SOS by founders James & Tom

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

 

 

When to take SOS?

As we know hydration is vital, knowing when to take SOS will help you hydrate effectively and you compete to your potential.  Here are some tips from the two founders and runners James and Tom.

 

Those were the days ...
Those were the days …

BEFORE:

It is important to be hydrated before exercise or competition, hence it is vital to know your hydration/nutrition needs. To be reminded then check out http://sosrehydrate.com/knowing-hydration-status/

Know your sweat rate, work out conditions and hydrate accordingly. We suggest taking an SOS in a water bottle sipped about an hour before.

The great thing about SOS is that it gets absorbed super quickly meaning that it wont loiter in your stomach giving you a stitch later.

 

DURING:

During competition, depending on the intensity here are our suggestions:

 

Road, marathon and ultra runners:

Those running anything over 10km, then we suggest you pre mix some SOS in a bit of water as a concentrate to add to your drinks on route.

SOS is not suggested to be drank with gels as the excess sugar affects the absorption.  It’s ok to use as a rinse to get rid of the gloopy gel.  Keep 15 min either side of a gel for best possible absorption.  After all gels aren’t needed for events under 1hr of duration.

Have 1 SOS per few hours of running.  This will not only keep you hydrated, but will ward off leg cramps.  SOS helps absorb the water faster than water alone, then liquid wont be sloshing around your stomach, rather it will be set to work where its needed most.

 

Middle and long distance track:

The founders former events.  Those middle and long distance track runners haven’t got time and its not needed during the race but ensure you are hydrated before and especially after.

SOS 800m Track Classic
SOS 800m Track Classic 2014

Sprinters:

SOS is great between rounds. Citrate buffers lactic acid, sodium keeps you hydrated for longer, potassium and magnesium will aid muscle contraction and prevent fatigue.

 

Field eventers and jumpers:

Its hot out there in the middle of the track and you are getting dehydrated just sitting there waiting for your next round.  Take a bottle mixed with SOS to keep you hydrated throughout the competition.

 

POST:

As soon as competition has been completed then take an SOS with a water bottle.  This will replace lost electrolytes, the citrates will buffer the lactate and the magnesium will aid recovery.

SOS is based off proven medical and sports science, it provides what you need while you are running.

 

Where else are electrolyte drinks handy?

 

Flights:  Immobility, decreased air moisture are some of the factors that lead to dehydration and jetlag while flying. Drinking an SOS just before landing will hydrate you faster, aid recovery from jet lag and help you adapt to the environment quicker.

SOS flying

 

Stomach upset: Especially relevant when traveling abroad for competition. Nausea, vomit, diarrhea, bloating and stomach cramps will decrease performance. SOS’ formula activates a mechanism in your gut that absorbs water faster, hydrating you faster when you need it.

Hangovers:  You have completed your ambition, won your personal race and now its time to celebrate!  Alcohol dehydrates you and hangovers are mainly dehydration related.  Take an SOS before you end your nights celebrations to help get you back to normal.

Lifestyle survival

Is SOS Informed Sport ratified?

Yes

We are as anti drug as you are and want to ensure our athletes are safe from any banned substances creeping into our products.

SOS Rehydrate logo

What is SOS?

SOS was created by mixing James and Tom’s elite running experience with Blanca’s medical knowledge. Based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) standards and the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations, SOS provides the optimum amount of electrolytes with the fastest possible absorption capabilities for athletes.

www.sosrehydrate.com

Happy Running

James and Tom

 

What have you conquered? #sosconquered competition coming soon

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

What have you conquered?

SOS Rehydrate challenges you think what you want to conquer and then let us know in the upcoming competition!

Stay tuned more details to follow

www.sosrehydrate.com

#sosconquered

 

 

The Story of Ultra Runner and SOS Champion Eric Orton

in SOS MAGAZINE/Testimonials/Uncategorized by

Eric Orton surely has his hands full – he’s not only an ultra runner, but also a coach, author of The Cool Impossible as well as the coach of the NY Times’ best selling Born To Run. We’re really proud to have Eric in our team of SOS champions and were stoked to have a chat with him during his Mountain Running Academy in Jackson to find out his story. Enjoy!

 

Where and how often do you run?

In the summer, I am on trails and in the mountains for all of my runs.  The mountains are so accessible here in Jackson that I can be on world-class trails either outside my door, in town, and a short drive North to Teton National Park.  I prefer big alpine mountain running with lots of vertical gain and this is what Jackson and the Teton’s are known for.  I tend to focus more on run time than miles because of the slower pace in the mountains and a typical week might be about 12-15 hours of running.

 

What is your SOS story?

I traveled to San Francisco on my book tour and a friend of mine there suggested I try SOS. Being a fat adapted runner, I am very fuel efficiency but still need a high level of electrolytes and when I tried SOS, I could immediately feel the performance gains of the electrolytes and didn’t have to deal with the negative effects of a high sugar and calories based mixture.  It no doubt felt like having an IV drip as a runner partner. I tend to lose a lot of sweat and weight during/after long runs, but this is no longer an issue once I started using SOS.  Not only does this improve my late in the run performance but equally helps my next day recovery time.  I was sold after this and I have come to rely only on SOS for runs up to 2:30 – 3:00 hours, which is huge not to have the need for calories.

 

What is your best running memory?

I have many memories, but one that will always be with me was my first mountain run in the Tetons.  I had spent 11 years running in Colorado before moving to Jackson, and running in the Tetons for the first time was mind blowing.  Everything is much closer to you and you feel like you are part of the mountains, the Tetons are truly world-class mountains with world-class trails.  And this run became so especially because I now knew this was my new home and in that moment, I realized how fortunate I am to live here!

 

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eric4

 

To purchase SOS, please click here

The Hinge: The Importance of Mental Toughness Competition

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by
SOS Rehydrate has teamed up with legendary mental toughness coach Dr Rob Bell for a cool competition:
Ask yourself this?
Has your performance boiled down to just hoping that you’re ready as opposed to knowing that you’re ready? Have you ever been stuck, experienced a major set-back, or lost confidence in yourself?
Chances are you are just one moment or event away from turning everything around. Mental Toughness is the ability that each of us possesses to perform well under pressure, and to handle the adversity that each of us will inevitably encounter.
Author and Mental Toughness coach, Dr. Rob Bell and SOS rehydrate are launching a competition to win a copy of his most recent Sport Psychology book The Hinge: the Importance of Mental Toughness.
Every door has a Hinge, a door without a hinge is a wall, it just doesn’t work. The Hinge is that event, moment, or person that will make all the difference in our lives. The Hinge connects who we are with who we become and it only takes one!! Will your Hinge connect? 
 
Download the first chapter here www.drrobbell.com. The audio-book is also available via amazon. The Hinge: The Importance of Mental Toughness

 

Whats the competition?

 

Simple:  Tell us what you want to achieve in the next 12 Months with #thehingesos .  The winner will be picked at random from the responses in a few weeks time

#thehingesos

#drrobbell

#sosrehydrate

#send4sos

www.sosrehydrate.com 

The Hinge with SOS Rehydrate
The Hinge with SOS Rehydrate

 

SOS Rehydrate review in Athletics Weekly

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

This weeks Athletics Weekly has just arrived and they are giving SOS rehydrate the low down.  Check out the link so see what they have to say as they join our rehydrated world!

http://www.athleticsweekly.com/featured/product-review-sos-rehydrate-1794/

 

SOS Rehydrate, Sir Ben ainslie onedition
SOS Rehydrate, Sir Ben ainslie onedition
SOS Rehydrate onedition
SOS Rehydrate
onedition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#send4sos

#sos4running

#athleticsweekly

#running

#rehydration

#recovery

 

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