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sos hydration

Road To Kona: Nutrition with Sarah Piampiano

in ATHLETES/BLOGS/SOS PRO'S/TRIATHLON by

Follow professional Ironman Triathlete Sarah Piampiano on her journey to Kona.

In this video, Sarah takes us behind the scenes of how she plans and executes her nutrition plan, and explains why it her changes have been so important.

Trust the process… Trust the plan. 

Behind the Scenes with Clayton Murphy

in ATHLETES/INTERVIEWS/RUNNING/SOS MAGAZINE/SOS PRO'S/USA by

SOS athlete Clayton Murphy races with the poise and experience that you’d expect from someone with far more experience. At the US Olympic trials he showed the country that he was more than ‘just’ a great college athlete, then he showed the world he was the real deal as he crossed the line in 3rd place in the 800m in Rio.

We caught up with Clayton to see what makes his wheels turn, and how he has transitioned seamlessly from college to life as a professional athlete.

For the past decade the 800m has come to be dominated by ‘specialists’, runners like Yuriy Borzakovskiy and David Rudisha who are pure half milers. You however, are reminiscent of the likes of Sebastian Coe and Steve Ovett, guys who could mix it up in both the 800m and the mile. Do you see yourself racing more regularly over the mile and above in the future?

I think the future of my race selection is interesting. I really enjoy both races, each with their own challenges and styles. So as far as a favourite I do not have one right now, and training for me for the 800/mile is similar. So I think right now I am really just enjoying both and keeping my options open for the future!

Clayton Murphy
©TrackAndFieldPhoto.com 2016 U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials

 

Many American athletes in particular struggle with the transition from college to professional running, especially given the lack of a ‘team’ atmosphere that is easy to become comfortable in. Are there any specific ways you have managed this transition so well?

I think the biggest transition I noticed was that you lose your everyday schedule and support group you had as a collegiate athlete. You lose your teammates, medical staff, academic staff, equipment people, etc. That group is no longer is there, so not only are you making the transition from running a collegiate season, you are transitioning and creating an entirely new support group.

Lucky for me I am able to help coach and train with my collegiate teammates, work everyday with Coach LaBadie still, and use the same massage therapist/sports chiro I used while I was a student-athlete. Being able to keep the core pieces of my “team” with me has been huge in making a smooth transition to life as a professional.

It’s easy to go mad as a professional runner, how do give yourself a break from training and routine day-in, day-out?

I think making sure that I have fun with running is the first priority. Everyday for me training has to be fun. If you are not having fun it doesn’t matter what you do outside of running because you’re going to go insane.

Outside of running I am finishing my schooling to receive a bachelors degree in Finance from the University of Akron, so that takes up time after workouts. I also play a lot of video games including PS4, Xbox One, and PC gaming. My roommates and I are very competitive in FIFA and the Call of Duty games

 

Some half-milers and milers are now making incorporating blocks at altitude in their training. Is this something you have ever considered?

At this point in my career I have not considered altitude training block yet. But I am not against it, I have not researched the idea enough to act on it yet.

Many find it difficult to adjust to life in the village at the Olympic Game’s given they are thrown completely out of their routines. How did you go about each day in Rio to make sure you still did all the little things and remain in a positive mindset?

In Rio for me, and other big meets I really try to just adapt and make do with what I have. I have learned over my three years in college that not every hotel, restaurant, city, practice facility, etc. is going to have the same thing you want every time.

With Rio we had to make a pretty big adaption. Our practice track was 1 to 1.5-hour bus ride away, so we had many runs that had to be done in the village. This was tough running concrete circles but if I wanted to compete well I had to get it done.

 

END

Prepare for Performance: Amazon Dash Button for SOS Hydration

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

sosdashPerformance at any level is defined by the finest of margins. From the weekend warrior battling with their personal record to an Olympian chasing the rewards of a lifetime of sacrifice, it can all be won or lost in an instant.

 

Training day-in, day-out takes a massive physical and mental toll, while gains in fitness can only be achieved when the body is able to recover. The window for recovery after a workout is small, and missing it can be the difference between achieving your goal and falling short.

 

Dehydration alone can result in up to a 25% loss of performance, which makes proper hydration a necessity for everyone who lives an active life, and SOS the perfect training partner.

 

Amazon Dash Button for SOS Hydration, which is exclusively available for Amazon Prime members, allows athletes and active individuals to conveniently ensure a hydrated lifestyle. Never run out of your SOS Hydration product, just push the Dash Button and an order will be processed and shipped without ever having to go to the store. It’s such an efficient way to the most effective hydration!

 

Amazon Dash Button is a Wi-Fi connected device that reorders your favorite product with the press of a button. Dash Button is simple to set up. Use the Amazon shopping app on your smartphone to easily connect the Dash Button to your home Wi-Fi network and then select the SOS Hydration product you want to reorder. Once connected, a single press of Dash Button automatically places your order with Prime free shipping – ensuring you never run out of your essentials again.

 

 

SOS Hydration Inc.

 

Founded by brothers and former national Middle distance Runners James and Tom Mayo and Blanca Lizaola M.D, a practicing specialist in Internal Medicine, with a passion for Gastrointerestional medicine.

 

SOS is a hydration solution that is based on proven sports and medical science to be as effective as an IV drip in combatting mild to moderate dehydration. SOS was founded as a result of the brothers wishing there was an effective hydration product on the market when they ran and when James served in the Military.

 

SOS is one of the only brands that actively encourages research into its product. Led by Chief Medical Officer, Blanca Lizaola M.D., the brand is going to continue to drive the edcuation of hydration throught fact not marketing spin!

Get one here: https://www.amazon.com/Amazon-JK29LP-Rehydrate-Dash-Button/dp/B01LX5TTVU/ref=sr_1_12?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1477411759&sr=1-12&refinements=p_n_date%3A1249100011

www.sosrehydrate.com

For more information email: info@sosrehydrate.com

Fancy running a mile?

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

OK fancy running a mile? Yep that’s 1609 meters or four laps of the track with 9 meters added on to make it the classic running distance known the world over.

Former world class miler and SOS aficionado Matt Yates gives you his lowdown of how to piece together the jigsaw that is a mile.

Matt Yates

WHAT IS THE MILE?

Here we go, and first things first, the mile is a historic distance loved all over the world and the magical barrier of Sub 4 minutes is still revered on the planet. So don’t take it lightly, you are doing a distance that is as recognized as the marathon as feat of human endurance and speed.

So I am not going into the history but it was ???? who ran the first sub 4 mile. Right that’s your first task go Google that and then you will get a feel for the historic importance of the distance and the mile’s place in our hearts. And why we love the distance in the UK and the USA, not to mention everywhere else on the planet.  While you are at it have read of the Wiki on the famous distance and its variations – HERE

History lesson over, so let’s get back to the game plan for the SOAR Mile and you to PB at Battersea Park on Wednesday 20th July.

TIMING AND PACING:

“STOP” before you take your first stride on the quest to a PB.

Ask your self what time do you want to run for the classic distance of a mile? Be real and think about it and what you can achieve.

When you know the TARGET time write it down on a bit of paper and stick it on the wall, so you are reminded of that ambition and goal on a daily basis.

Next, what pace do you need to run at to achieve your best time or target performance?

I always use this site HERE to calculate all times for sessions for the athletes I coach. For all the sessions below you will need to work out the split times that you need to run to achieve success. So you need to do a bit of pre-session admin and planning. When you have the times write them on your hand at the start of the session and go out and do them.

So, the distance you enter on the form is 1609 meters (yep that’s a mile) and then you fill out the time you want and then you add the rep distance (lap split) to get the time you will need to perform in each rep in training. For example want to run a 5 min mile and the session is 15 x 200 its 37.3 per 200 meters rep. OK the office work admin is done.

WARM UP:

Right, I am stickler for doing it right or don’t bother to do it and that means warming up correctly. What really gets to me? Athletes that turn up in the wrong kit, it pisses me off. (note from the editor: you definitely don’t want Matt Yates pissed off with you before the session has even started) Yes that’s right if you want to warm up for a session you need to get a bit hot and sweaty.

So a decent session warm up:

12/14 minute jog at just faster than walking pace to start with picking up slightly at the end.

Then stretch for 15+ minutes. Check out this for exercises – HERE

Get your race flats on and its time 4 x 80 meter strides at 70% 80% 90% 95% effort and walk slowly back as the recovery. Nice article on racing flats – HERE

10 KEY WORKOUTS:

I am listing 10 key sessions here to get that Mile personal best. What you do between the sessions is simple, its easy running of 25 mins to 45 mins max at your comfort recovery pace and not blitzing it like a Kenyan running the London marathon. Its up to you how many runs you do between the sessions and that’s your call. But remember its about getting the sessions done at decent quality level and using the easy runs to refill the body tank.

1 – Monday 27th June
Find a decent park or sports fields for this session.

Warm up as above and then 8 x 70 secs with 60 secs recovery between reps.

You wont know how far you are running but just run free, fast and in control and concentrate as those reps will get hard about number 5 if you are doing it right.

Warm down jog for 10 mins

2 – Thursday 30th June
Track time (if your in London see what tracks are about near you and check opening times – HERE. This is one of my favorite sessions for the miler.

15 x 200m off the rep time before as recovery, so if you run 37.3 secs you get that as the recovery time and you go again. If you think running slow means more recovery that means you cheat yourself out of the target time.

Remember use the site to the working out what times you need to set out to run on the reps (not reminding you again).

3 – Saturday 2nd July
Track work – yes you guessed it WARM UP correctly.

Then its Bends & Straights.

That’s 100m fast 100m jog for 12 laps.

How fast should you run? Well I say as fast as you can cope with but not like your Usain Bolt. More like that 80% stride you in the warm up. Don’t time it, just run it free and enjoy it the sensation of speed.
Your call if you run the bends fast or maybe you want to run the straights fast?

4 – Tuesday 5th July
Track work – nice session this, and time to feel like a real miler.

Session at target mile pace for the 600m & 400m and then getting faster as reps decrease in distance like you are trying to outkick Seb Coe in a “Phoenix from the flames” moment.

A. 600m (2 mins rest), 400m (2 mins rest), 200m (60 secs rest), 100m

Take 5 mins rest/walk/jog and have an SOS then back at it and see if you can beat the first sets times as target.

B. 600m (2 mins rest), 400m (2 mins rest), 200m (60 secs rest), 100m

5 – Thursday 7th July
Park time session same place as you done the session on the 27th June.

Warm up – then its 12 x 50 secs off 70 secs rest – keep those recovery times spot on and keep on the workload output in the reps. Its going to be tough but your know your going places by the end of the workout.

Warm down.

6 – Saturday 9th July
Track workout

Warm up

Reps at race pace (yep do some admin on that site)

A. 4 x 400m off 90 secs recovery

10 mins rec between sets

B. 4 x 400m off 90 secs recovery

Warm down

7 – Tuesday 12th July
Track Workout

Warm up and get in the competitive zone “FOCUS on the task in hand”.

Time trial day – yep your going on the track and you will do 3 laps at race target pace. That’s 1200m on the track and see if you can get someone to time you and shout your times every 200m to keep you target.

Take a rest for 15 minutes jog/walk hydrate.

Then do 5 x 150 at stride pace you do in the warm up and take a 250 walk between the reps.

Warm down

8 – Thursday 14th July
Track Workout – nice quality feel fast session at slightly faster than race pace. Maybe drop your target time down on the sheet by 15% for the target rep times but that’s your call (see disclaimer at end of article). This session will be over before you know it so give it some.

Warm up

1. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

5 mins recovery walk/jog

2. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

5 mins recovery walk/jog

3. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

Saturday 16th July
Track workout – “The need for speed”, Run these free and as fast as you want and try make each one faster than the last but work into it and enjoy running fast like it’s the last 200 of the race.

Warm up

5 x 200m with your target time as the recovery period. So if you aim to run 5 mins for the mile you get 5 mins recovery time between reps but stay warm and stretched.

Warm down

9 – Monday 18th July
Almost at race day now – so nothing hard, its chill time and get into the SOS partner music listings Evermix 

Track Workout

Warm up

And its easy 4 x 120m stride outs with walk back recovery at a comfortable fast pace.

Warm down

10 – Wednesday 20th July
if in UK enter the SOAR MILE & run new personal best for the MILE.  If not then get your friends to cheer you on to a PB at your local track.  Even get a few of them to pace you.

These are hard sessions, so make sure you are fit enough to take them on, and stop straight away if anything stars to hurt. 

 

Matt Yates ran his first sub 4 mile at 20 years old and has a mile PB of 3.52. Matt was the winner of the New York, Madrid, Sydney, Edingburgh and a whole host of mile races round the world and was one of the worlds top 1500m athletes in the 1990s.

He recently started coaching at the age of 46 and in no time has built up a group of highly succesful young British middle distance athletes. Read more about his training group here in Left Spike magazine – HERE

 

SOS tops independent research trial for effective hydration

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

SOS subjects’ hydration status significantly improved in an independent research trial.

 

A combined independent study, led by Coventry University and Newman University, in the United Kingdom, analyzed the effectiveness of rehydration beverages following an interval training session in highly trained middle-distance runners.

 

SOS was compared against an electrolyte sports drink tablet (Nuun) and a placebo of flavoured water.

 

The results were resoundingly in SOS’s favour.

 

Within 12 hours of drinking SOS, the subjects had recovered their plasma volume and body mass completely.

 

When taking the electrolyte tablet, or flavoured water, neither plasma volume or the body mass of the subjects had recovered to pre work out levels, therefore increasing their risk of dehydration.

 

This study identifies that the subjects who used SOS hydrated faster and more effectively than those subjects who used other drinks.

 

See Fig 1. and 2.

 

What does this mean?

Simply put, taking SOS facilitates hydration and recovery better and faster than water or Nuun tablets.

 

In sports, hydration is critical. According to Gleeson et al., a loss of 2% body weight can lead to a 5% loss in performance over 10km and a 3% loss in performance over 800m / Mile. That could be the difference between a sub-4 minute mile or a 4:06 mile, a loss of 1 minute 45 seconds over 10km for a 35min target 10km, or the difference between winning and finishing out of the medals.

Fig1 Body Mass

Figure 1: Mean (±95% CI) percentage change in body mass. Placebo (PLA):6% chance of an unlikely benefit; SOS: 84% chance of a likely benefit and ESD (Nuun): 6% chance of an unlikely benefit (Hopkins, 2000).

 

Starting the day in a negative dehydration state will diminish recovery and quality of subsequent workouts. Dehydration can lead to headaches, tiredness, fatigue and potentially more serious complications.

 

 

 

Figure 2 Plasma Volume

Figure 2: Mean (± 95% CI) change in plasma volume. SOS: 81% chance of a likely benefit Vs. ESD; SOS: 96% chance of a very likely benefit Vs. Placebo and ESD (Nuun) 63% chance of a possible benefit Vs. PLA (Hopkins, 2000).

 

 

 

With proven scientific results, SOS should be in every runner’s bottle, whether to hydrate between rounds in competition, to use before, during and after a workout, or to help you stay hydrated for what everyday life throws at you.

 

SOS can be purchased from www.ineedsos.com

 

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