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SOS Rehydrate

Forget the post workout ice bath – study suggests hot water, instead

in BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING by

Written by Alex Hutchinson for The Globe and Mail 

The epitome of the hard-core, no-pain-no-gain approach to training is the post-workout ice bath. After pushing your muscles to their limits, you soak them in teeth-chatteringly cold water to speed their recovery before the next gruelling workout.

But there may be a gentler, more soothing path to greatness.

A recent study in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports suggests that swapping the ice tub for a relaxing soak in a hot bath can trigger performance-boosting adaptations that mimic how the body adjusts to hot weather. That is particularly valuable for those training through cold conditions – a Canadian winter, say – for a springtime race where the weather can be unexpectedly hot.

Better yet, hot baths actually feel good, points out Neil Walsh, director of the Extremes Research Group at the Bangor University in Wales and the senior author of the new study. “A hot soak is comfortable for aching limbs,” he says, “and there are other supposed health benefits – think Roman spas.”

Walsh’s interest in the topic dates back to his days as a competitive road cyclist. “I’d always taken a hot bath after a long training ride, and it didn’t make sense to me as a physiologist why a cold bath would be helpful.”

The idea that hot baths, beyond being pleasant, might actually boost performance stems from recent research into heat adaptation. After one to two weeks of exercising in hot conditions, your core temperature will drop, your sweat rate will increase and you will produce a greater volume of blood plasma, all of which will enhance your ability to perform in the heat.

A controversial 2010 study from researchers at the University of Oregon suggested that the same process of heat adaptation could also enhance endurance in cool conditions. This idea remains hotly contested (it was the topic of a debate in the Journal of Physiology last month), but the study spurred interest in more convenient ways of triggering heat adaptation.

An Australian study last year found that four days of 30-minute postrun saunas at 87 C produced a large increase in plasma volume.

It’s important to replace the fluids you lose during heat adaptation. SOS works just as rapidly as an IV Drip. Try it here today 

Still, not everyone has easy access to a heat-controlled treadmill or a sauna, so Walsh and his colleagues wondered whether a simple hot bath could provide some of the same benefits. They recruited 17 volunteers to run for 40 minutes on a treadmill for six consecutive days, followed each time by a 40-minute bath submerged to the neck. Ten of the volunteers were assigned to hot baths at 40 C, while the other seven took “thermoneutral” baths at 34 C.

By the end of the study, the hot-bath group had a lower resting rectal temperature by an average of 0.27 C, their temperature stayed lower during exercise and they began sweating sooner. Their performance in a five-kilometre treadmill trial improved by 5 per cent in hot conditions (33 C), though it didn’t change in cool conditions (18 C).

These are compelling results – but it’s worth nothing that the baths were pretty intense. On the first day, Walsh says, only four of the 10 hot-bath volunteers were able to complete 40 minutes, though nine of the 10 were able to complete it by the fifth day of adaptation. He and his colleagues hope to test less-onerous protocols in future studies: “As little as 20 minutes in the hot bath may be necessary to provide heat acclimation,” he says, but “this needs confirmation.”

So, will hot baths replace cold baths as the default postworkout soak? That depends on who you are, physiologist Trent Stellingwerff points out. Olympic endurance athletes such as those he works with at the Canadian Sport Institute Pacific in Victoria already have extremely high blood-plasma volumes, so hot baths may not provide enough of a stimulus to make any difference. Non-elite athletes, in contrast, might see a bigger benefit.

For now, there are few firm conclusions to be drawn. But if you are training through the winter for an event with potentially warm weather, a few hot baths seem like a low-risk insurance policy.

“I definitely felt the heat when I ran the Ottawa Marathon [in late May] in 2009,” Guelph-based marathoner Reid Coolsaet recalls. “It wasn’t even that hot, but I wasn’t used to it at all.”

Coolsaet plans to use a steam sauna to help him prepare for the expected heat of the Olympics in Brazil this year, though the late-summer timing of the Games means that he will not need much help getting used to muggy conditions. “Luckily,” he says drily, “the weather in Guelph in July and August is comparable to that in Rio.”

If you do decide to try hot baths this winter, bear in mind that heat puts additional stress on the body. For starters, stick to 10 minutes at no more than 40 C (a standard upper limit for hot tubs), and get out immediately if you feel dizzy or nauseous.

Hydration On The Run

in BLOGS/RECOVERY/RUNNING by
Adapted from Matt Fitzgerald

Hydration during running is not as complicated as you may have been led to believe.

When you run, you sweat. The more you sweat, the more your blood volume decreases. The more your blood volume decreases, the harder your heart has to work to deliver oxygen to your working muscles.

Sounds dangerous, but it’s really not. Runners almost never experience dehydration levels sufficient to cause major health consequences. But normal levels of dehydration will make you feel uncomfortable and cause you to slow down.

Drinking while you run will limit these negative effects of dehydration. But what should you drink, how much, and when?

SOS can be compared to an IV drip. It works just as rapidly but is safer and cheaper at combating mild to moderate dehydration. Try it here

In the past, athletes were encouraged to drink as much as possible during exercise, or at least to drink enough to completely offset dehydration (that is, to drink enough to prevent any decrease in body weight during exercise). However, it is now understood that this is bad advice, for two reasons.

Firstly, it is possible to drink too much during exercise. Forcing yourself to swallow more fluid than your body really needs while running may cause gastrointestinal distress, and in extreme cases it can cause a dangerous condition known as water intoxication, or hyponatremia. Secondly, research has shown that drinking to completely offset sweating offers no advantage with respect to performance or body temperature regulation compared to drinking by thirst.

The new exercise hydration advice is in fact to drink according to your thirst. As long as you keep an adequate supply of a palatable drink accessible during your runs, you will naturally drink enough to optimize your performance if you just drink as often and as much as your thirst dictates.

Dehydration only affects performance in workouts lasting longer than an hour, so you don’t have to drink during workouts that are shorter than an hour. However, you can if you like.

Fancy running a mile?

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

OK fancy running a mile? Yep that’s 1609 meters or four laps of the track with 9 meters added on to make it the classic running distance known the world over.

Former world class miler and SOS aficionado Matt Yates gives you his lowdown of how to piece together the jigsaw that is a mile.

Matt Yates

WHAT IS THE MILE?

Here we go, and first things first, the mile is a historic distance loved all over the world and the magical barrier of Sub 4 minutes is still revered on the planet. So don’t take it lightly, you are doing a distance that is as recognized as the marathon as feat of human endurance and speed.

So I am not going into the history but it was ???? who ran the first sub 4 mile. Right that’s your first task go Google that and then you will get a feel for the historic importance of the distance and the mile’s place in our hearts. And why we love the distance in the UK and the USA, not to mention everywhere else on the planet.  While you are at it have read of the Wiki on the famous distance and its variations – HERE

History lesson over, so let’s get back to the game plan for the SOAR Mile and you to PB at Battersea Park on Wednesday 20th July.

TIMING AND PACING:

“STOP” before you take your first stride on the quest to a PB.

Ask your self what time do you want to run for the classic distance of a mile? Be real and think about it and what you can achieve.

When you know the TARGET time write it down on a bit of paper and stick it on the wall, so you are reminded of that ambition and goal on a daily basis.

Next, what pace do you need to run at to achieve your best time or target performance?

I always use this site HERE to calculate all times for sessions for the athletes I coach. For all the sessions below you will need to work out the split times that you need to run to achieve success. So you need to do a bit of pre-session admin and planning. When you have the times write them on your hand at the start of the session and go out and do them.

So, the distance you enter on the form is 1609 meters (yep that’s a mile) and then you fill out the time you want and then you add the rep distance (lap split) to get the time you will need to perform in each rep in training. For example want to run a 5 min mile and the session is 15 x 200 its 37.3 per 200 meters rep. OK the office work admin is done.

WARM UP:

Right, I am stickler for doing it right or don’t bother to do it and that means warming up correctly. What really gets to me? Athletes that turn up in the wrong kit, it pisses me off. (note from the editor: you definitely don’t want Matt Yates pissed off with you before the session has even started) Yes that’s right if you want to warm up for a session you need to get a bit hot and sweaty.

So a decent session warm up:

12/14 minute jog at just faster than walking pace to start with picking up slightly at the end.

Then stretch for 15+ minutes. Check out this for exercises – HERE

Get your race flats on and its time 4 x 80 meter strides at 70% 80% 90% 95% effort and walk slowly back as the recovery. Nice article on racing flats – HERE

10 KEY WORKOUTS:

I am listing 10 key sessions here to get that Mile personal best. What you do between the sessions is simple, its easy running of 25 mins to 45 mins max at your comfort recovery pace and not blitzing it like a Kenyan running the London marathon. Its up to you how many runs you do between the sessions and that’s your call. But remember its about getting the sessions done at decent quality level and using the easy runs to refill the body tank.

1 – Monday 27th June
Find a decent park or sports fields for this session.

Warm up as above and then 8 x 70 secs with 60 secs recovery between reps.

You wont know how far you are running but just run free, fast and in control and concentrate as those reps will get hard about number 5 if you are doing it right.

Warm down jog for 10 mins

2 – Thursday 30th June
Track time (if your in London see what tracks are about near you and check opening times – HERE. This is one of my favorite sessions for the miler.

15 x 200m off the rep time before as recovery, so if you run 37.3 secs you get that as the recovery time and you go again. If you think running slow means more recovery that means you cheat yourself out of the target time.

Remember use the site to the working out what times you need to set out to run on the reps (not reminding you again).

3 – Saturday 2nd July
Track work – yes you guessed it WARM UP correctly.

Then its Bends & Straights.

That’s 100m fast 100m jog for 12 laps.

How fast should you run? Well I say as fast as you can cope with but not like your Usain Bolt. More like that 80% stride you in the warm up. Don’t time it, just run it free and enjoy it the sensation of speed.
Your call if you run the bends fast or maybe you want to run the straights fast?

4 – Tuesday 5th July
Track work – nice session this, and time to feel like a real miler.

Session at target mile pace for the 600m & 400m and then getting faster as reps decrease in distance like you are trying to outkick Seb Coe in a “Phoenix from the flames” moment.

A. 600m (2 mins rest), 400m (2 mins rest), 200m (60 secs rest), 100m

Take 5 mins rest/walk/jog and have an SOS then back at it and see if you can beat the first sets times as target.

B. 600m (2 mins rest), 400m (2 mins rest), 200m (60 secs rest), 100m

5 – Thursday 7th July
Park time session same place as you done the session on the 27th June.

Warm up – then its 12 x 50 secs off 70 secs rest – keep those recovery times spot on and keep on the workload output in the reps. Its going to be tough but your know your going places by the end of the workout.

Warm down.

6 – Saturday 9th July
Track workout

Warm up

Reps at race pace (yep do some admin on that site)

A. 4 x 400m off 90 secs recovery

10 mins rec between sets

B. 4 x 400m off 90 secs recovery

Warm down

7 – Tuesday 12th July
Track Workout

Warm up and get in the competitive zone “FOCUS on the task in hand”.

Time trial day – yep your going on the track and you will do 3 laps at race target pace. That’s 1200m on the track and see if you can get someone to time you and shout your times every 200m to keep you target.

Take a rest for 15 minutes jog/walk hydrate.

Then do 5 x 150 at stride pace you do in the warm up and take a 250 walk between the reps.

Warm down

8 – Thursday 14th July
Track Workout – nice quality feel fast session at slightly faster than race pace. Maybe drop your target time down on the sheet by 15% for the target rep times but that’s your call (see disclaimer at end of article). This session will be over before you know it so give it some.

Warm up

1. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

5 mins recovery walk/jog

2. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

5 mins recovery walk/jog

3. 300m (90 sec recovery), 150m, (60 secs recovery), 100m

Saturday 16th July
Track workout – “The need for speed”, Run these free and as fast as you want and try make each one faster than the last but work into it and enjoy running fast like it’s the last 200 of the race.

Warm up

5 x 200m with your target time as the recovery period. So if you aim to run 5 mins for the mile you get 5 mins recovery time between reps but stay warm and stretched.

Warm down

9 – Monday 18th July
Almost at race day now – so nothing hard, its chill time and get into the SOS partner music listings Evermix 

Track Workout

Warm up

And its easy 4 x 120m stride outs with walk back recovery at a comfortable fast pace.

Warm down

10 – Wednesday 20th July
if in UK enter the SOAR MILE & run new personal best for the MILE.  If not then get your friends to cheer you on to a PB at your local track.  Even get a few of them to pace you.

These are hard sessions, so make sure you are fit enough to take them on, and stop straight away if anything stars to hurt. 

 

Matt Yates ran his first sub 4 mile at 20 years old and has a mile PB of 3.52. Matt was the winner of the New York, Madrid, Sydney, Edingburgh and a whole host of mile races round the world and was one of the worlds top 1500m athletes in the 1990s.

He recently started coaching at the age of 46 and in no time has built up a group of highly succesful young British middle distance athletes. Read more about his training group here in Left Spike magazine – HERE

 

SOS tops independent research trial for effective hydration

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

SOS subjects’ hydration status significantly improved in an independent research trial.

 

A combined independent study, led by Coventry University and Newman University, in the United Kingdom, analyzed the effectiveness of rehydration beverages following an interval training session in highly trained middle-distance runners.

 

SOS was compared against an electrolyte sports drink tablet (Nuun) and a placebo of flavoured water.

 

The results were resoundingly in SOS’s favour.

 

Within 12 hours of drinking SOS, the subjects had recovered their plasma volume and body mass completely.

 

When taking the electrolyte tablet, or flavoured water, neither plasma volume or the body mass of the subjects had recovered to pre work out levels, therefore increasing their risk of dehydration.

 

This study identifies that the subjects who used SOS hydrated faster and more effectively than those subjects who used other drinks.

 

See Fig 1. and 2.

 

What does this mean?

Simply put, taking SOS facilitates hydration and recovery better and faster than water or Nuun tablets.

 

In sports, hydration is critical. According to Gleeson et al., a loss of 2% body weight can lead to a 5% loss in performance over 10km and a 3% loss in performance over 800m / Mile. That could be the difference between a sub-4 minute mile or a 4:06 mile, a loss of 1 minute 45 seconds over 10km for a 35min target 10km, or the difference between winning and finishing out of the medals.

Fig1 Body Mass

Figure 1: Mean (±95% CI) percentage change in body mass. Placebo (PLA):6% chance of an unlikely benefit; SOS: 84% chance of a likely benefit and ESD (Nuun): 6% chance of an unlikely benefit (Hopkins, 2000).

 

Starting the day in a negative dehydration state will diminish recovery and quality of subsequent workouts. Dehydration can lead to headaches, tiredness, fatigue and potentially more serious complications.

 

 

 

Figure 2 Plasma Volume

Figure 2: Mean (± 95% CI) change in plasma volume. SOS: 81% chance of a likely benefit Vs. ESD; SOS: 96% chance of a very likely benefit Vs. Placebo and ESD (Nuun) 63% chance of a possible benefit Vs. PLA (Hopkins, 2000).

 

 

 

With proven scientific results, SOS should be in every runner’s bottle, whether to hydrate between rounds in competition, to use before, during and after a workout, or to help you stay hydrated for what everyday life throws at you.

 

SOS can be purchased from www.ineedsos.com

 

The importance of self massage in recovery

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

The Importance of Self Massage in Recovery:

Recovery is vital to performance. The body needs time to repair itself. Self massage and proper hydration are the keys to the door.

This month we have teamed up with the team at Addaday who have kindly offered to give away several of their cool massage stix. We have been using one and they rock.  We will also throw in a months supply of the new SOS because you know the importance of hydration in keeping muscles loose!  Share and tag this post #sosaddaday to be in for a chance to win.

 

Perfect mix, SOS with Addaday
Perfect mix, SOS with Addaday

Here Addaday’s distinguished PT, Robert Forster explains the benefits:

 

Every physical therapist wants you to know that your body needs attention every day for it to continue to function properly throughout life. Whether you exercise regularly or not, everyday life leaves your muscles tired and tight, and your joints off center. Stretching and self massage techniques are the key tools to mitigate the physical toll of everyday life, and of your workouts.

With athletes and desk workers alike, much of our work is focused on mitigating the damaging effects of daily activities. Long days, poorly-designed chairs, and poor posture all work to corrupt your alignment and stress your joints.

So why should we use self massage??

 

1) Increase circulation: Manipulation of the muscles causes the blood vessels to dilate and pump more blood into the muscles and fascia.

Benefits:

  • Before Exercise: warms up the tissues and make them more pliable to stretching, and less prone to injury.
  • After Exercise: flushes the residue of exercise (i.e. metabolic waste products) from the muscles to hasten recovery.

 

2) Treats Connective Tissue scarring and muscular adhesions, which result from normal training and body imbalances.

Benefits:

  • Before Exercise: breaks down dysfunctional scarring that forms as your body attempts to heal from the stress of your previous workouts. Helps create functional scarring that makes you more resilient to injury.
  • After Exercise: relaxes tired and tight muscles, works out the knots (muscle spasms) that occur when muscles are overtaxed.

 

3) Sensory Stimulation from the proprietary, textured surfaces of massage tools stimulate the nervous system to create a reflex relaxation of the muscles, much the same way acupressure works.

Benefits:

  • Before Exercise: works out the knots and relaxes the small muscle spasms, known as trigger points, which result from workouts and daily life and interfere with proper muscle and joint function.
  • After Exercise: relaxes muscle spasm that occurs in fatigued or overtaxed muscles.

 

“Recovery is when your body actually grows stronger and more efficient. It is when the benefits of your hard training are realized. Working hard is easy, everyone knows how to work hard, but those who work hard at recover are the ones who win,”

— Bob Kersee, the most successful track & field coach, with over 50 Olympic medal-winning performances.

 

Only during recovery does your fitness grow. Workouts don’t build fitness, they break your body down, and only if you allow recovery time and actively help your tissues heal, do you become stronger and more fit.

 

Hydration the SOS way
Hydration the SOS way

Recovery is not laying on the sofa eating comfort food. There is nothing passive about recovery. Recovery is an active process where light “adaptation” workouts stimulate recovery better than rest alone. Light workouts are akin to the self-cleaning oven, where the heat is turned up to burn off the residue from cooking but no roast is placed inside. Light workouts provide the body the same opportunity to do house cleaning functions without having to recover from the damaging effects of a new workout. With the increased core temperature associated with recovery workouts, your body sets into motion an army of heat shock proteins that immediately go to work repairing an rebuilding tissues damaged by training.

 

With light activity, the vascular system is stimulated to increase blood flow to the muscles, delivering oxygen and nutrients to aide recovery. The muscle cells, stimulated by a release of hormones, step up the reparative functions and grow stronger. Similar occurrences improve connective tissue and bone repair as well. Stretching and self massage efforts before and particularly after light recovery workouts are more productive when unencumbered by the tightness that would otherwise occur following hard workouts. In this way, your stretching efforts go further toward elongating connective tissue and helping tendons and ligaments heal and grow stronger. A good indication of when your structural system is recovered and ready for another hard workout is when the stiffness from the last hard workout is absent.

 

Self-massage, with the use of massage sticks and rollers, is one of the best methods to aide recovery after workouts. Manipulation of the muscles and tissues increases blood flow, breaks down muscle and connective tissue adhesions, and promotes adaptation of these tissues to withstand the rigors of your training as you progress toward your goals.

You will feel the fatigue and tension leave your body. When coupled with stretching and icing sore areas, these self-recovery techniques can make a very significant contribution to the adaptive process you seek, along with increased fitness.

 

Add that to some properly hydrated muscles and your recovery has just gained in effectiveness!

What is Addaday:  Scientifically-designed massage sticks, foam rollers, bodywork balls, and a flexible massage device called the Boomerang, all incorporate varied surface textures and shapes designed to release muscle and tendon adhesions, and provide a daily realignment of your joints.

#sosaddaday
#sosaddaday

 

When to take SOS by founders James & Tom

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

 

 

When to take SOS?

As we know hydration is vital, knowing when to take SOS will help you hydrate effectively and you compete to your potential.  Here are some tips from the two founders and runners James and Tom.

 

Those were the days ...
Those were the days …

BEFORE:

It is important to be hydrated before exercise or competition, hence it is vital to know your hydration/nutrition needs. To be reminded then check out http://sosrehydrate.com/knowing-hydration-status/

Know your sweat rate, work out conditions and hydrate accordingly. We suggest taking an SOS in a water bottle sipped about an hour before.

The great thing about SOS is that it gets absorbed super quickly meaning that it wont loiter in your stomach giving you a stitch later.

 

DURING:

During competition, depending on the intensity here are our suggestions:

 

Road, marathon and ultra runners:

Those running anything over 10km, then we suggest you pre mix some SOS in a bit of water as a concentrate to add to your drinks on route.

SOS is not suggested to be drank with gels as the excess sugar affects the absorption.  It’s ok to use as a rinse to get rid of the gloopy gel.  Keep 15 min either side of a gel for best possible absorption.  After all gels aren’t needed for events under 1hr of duration.

Have 1 SOS per few hours of running.  This will not only keep you hydrated, but will ward off leg cramps.  SOS helps absorb the water faster than water alone, then liquid wont be sloshing around your stomach, rather it will be set to work where its needed most.

 

Middle and long distance track:

The founders former events.  Those middle and long distance track runners haven’t got time and its not needed during the race but ensure you are hydrated before and especially after.

SOS 800m Track Classic
SOS 800m Track Classic 2014

Sprinters:

SOS is great between rounds. Citrate buffers lactic acid, sodium keeps you hydrated for longer, potassium and magnesium will aid muscle contraction and prevent fatigue.

 

Field eventers and jumpers:

Its hot out there in the middle of the track and you are getting dehydrated just sitting there waiting for your next round.  Take a bottle mixed with SOS to keep you hydrated throughout the competition.

 

POST:

As soon as competition has been completed then take an SOS with a water bottle.  This will replace lost electrolytes, the citrates will buffer the lactate and the magnesium will aid recovery.

SOS is based off proven medical and sports science, it provides what you need while you are running.

 

Where else are electrolyte drinks handy?

 

Flights:  Immobility, decreased air moisture are some of the factors that lead to dehydration and jetlag while flying. Drinking an SOS just before landing will hydrate you faster, aid recovery from jet lag and help you adapt to the environment quicker.

SOS flying

 

Stomach upset: Especially relevant when traveling abroad for competition. Nausea, vomit, diarrhea, bloating and stomach cramps will decrease performance. SOS’ formula activates a mechanism in your gut that absorbs water faster, hydrating you faster when you need it.

Hangovers:  You have completed your ambition, won your personal race and now its time to celebrate!  Alcohol dehydrates you and hangovers are mainly dehydration related.  Take an SOS before you end your nights celebrations to help get you back to normal.

Lifestyle survival

Is SOS Informed Sport ratified?

Yes

We are as anti drug as you are and want to ensure our athletes are safe from any banned substances creeping into our products.

SOS Rehydrate logo

What is SOS?

SOS was created by mixing James and Tom’s elite running experience with Blanca’s medical knowledge. Based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) standards and the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations, SOS provides the optimum amount of electrolytes with the fastest possible absorption capabilities for athletes.

www.sosrehydrate.com

Happy Running

James and Tom

 

Knowing your hydration status

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

Knowing your hydration status is key to performing at your peak.

The great news is that it isn’t rocket science.  SOS founder Dr Blanca gives us some top tips

SOS Rehydrate

Knowing your hydration status

There is no rule of thumb when it comes to hydration. Everybody is different and has different needs. Learn to listen to your body.

The best way to assess your hydration status is through your urine.

1 – Understand that when you are hydrated you should be urinating a similar volume to what you are drinking.

2 – Urine color: by urinating light clear urine you will know that you are properly hydrated. Dark, orange and small amount of urine reflects dehydration.

 

Are you a salty sweater?

Not everybody needs to consume the same amount of sodium. There are some signs that can help you realize how much of a sodium sweater are you:

  1. a) Muscle cramps: sodium, chloride and potassium are the main electrolytes involved in muscle contraction. When any of these electrolytes are low or when there is not enough muscle perfusion due to dehydration the muscle contractility process will be impaired.
  2. b) After drying, your clothes will have white lines on your clothes
  3. c) When getting sweat in your eyes they will burn or even your sweat will taste salty

Dehydration affects performance

Next time you need hydrating remember these easy steps and hydrate accordingly.

To learn more about the science of SOS check out our science page www.sosrehydrate.com

Whats your Rehydrated Resolution for 2015?

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

2014 is but an ember in the fire place … It is time to briefly bask in the dying glow of a fun packed and rehydrated 2014 before we look forward to lighting a new fire for the adventures that await in 2015.

First, let us cast our minds back to our highlights of our first full year of rehydration:

1 – The best is seeing Our Rehydrated World grow.  It is thanks to you and our champions for making this happen. We love you all and thank you!!

2 – Being named Top 3 in the World Beverage Awards – best sports drink category SOS is Best sports or fitness drink finalist 2014

3 – Launching the blueberry and citrus flavors

SOS coming at you
SOS off the line

4 – Opening in the founders home country UK with Sweatshop then Up and Running and Runners Need to quickly become one of the top selling hydration drinks in those stores.

5 – Our birth place San Francisco opening up Crunch Fitness and the continued support from Fleet FeetShift and Sports Basement.

Crunch Gyms
Crunch Gyms

6 – Growing New Zealand with the great team at Shoe Clinic, all of the Unichem and Life Pharmacies, Fresh Choice Queenstown, Platinum Sports to name but a few of the great partnerships we have. Also we began in Hawaii with CVS Longs Drugstores and built new partnerships with the North Shore Lifeguards crew.

7 – Publishing our first research study (an Industry first) and growing closer ties with elite performance centers like The Foundry and Core Pilates and Fitnesss.  We constantly push ratification and performance research.

7 – Developing the luxury market by becoming a staple hangover cure and mixer on Sir Richard Bransons Necker Island and now his latest island Mosquito. We also gatecrashed Coachella and Sundance alongside Oakley which was fun.

Necker Island
Necker Island

 

 

What about you?  what were your best bits of 2014?

 

Even Victoria Secret models get thirsty on the slopes
Even Victoria Secret models get thirsty on the slopes

 

 

Enough of the past, time to look forward.  We can’t wait to get started!

Whats our rehydrated resolution?

To become the trusted running, triathlon and Lifestyle Survival hydration brand.

 

Lifestyle Survival
Lifestyle Survival

Some sneak previews:

1 – New packaging design.  Same silver cool, just tweaked with a new easy tear stick design and new serving suggestion.

2 – A new 40 stick box.  We won’t compromise the product with a tub so this is the closest thing.  A months supply of SOS in an easy to store box with less waste.

3 – A new flavor – we think mango?

4 – A new color for the logo cross. Out with the red and now in with the electric blue.  It is gradually making its way onto all our social media and will be on packaging from next month

5 – Probably the bit and the one we are most excited about: an Ambassador program for our most passionate SOS’ers

 

Whats your Rehydrated Resolution for 2015?

Tell us your resolution on Twitter or Facebook and then let us know throughout the year how your resolution is going.

This is your company and we want you to be part of our growth and our story.

 

Wishing everyone a very happy New Year, good luck with achieving your resolution and best wishes for 2015

The Founders

James, Tom, Blanca

 

Get SOS Here

 

 

Run Faster ..Reduce Sugar .. SOS Marathon Fueling

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

Run Faster .. Reduce Sugar .. SOS Marathon Fueling by marathon super coach Gaz @Getrunning

We recently caught up with Gaz at Getrunning who has taken hundreds of runners through their first (and subsequent) marathons to talk about his experience of using SOS during a race.

Get that SOS into you
SOS time!

Here are his top 5 tips:

 

  1. Train your body away from excess sugar. Many first time runners are very reliant on sugar as a key fuel to their normal diet, so when they first run for a long distance (60mins plus) many people crave sugar when in reality they should be able to run with less of it. You should be able to get to the 2.0 to 2.5 hour mark before you begin to seriously fuel. Our suggestion is to train the body away from using high sugar drink products. It does not feel great when you first begin to train without using sugar, but trust us, after 6 weeks or so you will notice how good you feel when you run and how moving away from excess sugar can help your running performance over time.
  1. What should I eat after 2.5-3hrs? We have seen the benefit of using prunes, bananas, oranges and dates at this time and using them every 40 mins or so. They are well digested and easy to take on board. Other fuels we have seen are sports Jubes, you can take on smaller amounts of sugar this way, but really you have to learn what fuel works for you. Don’t forget the more hydrated you are, the easier the fueling process becomes.
  1. Race preparation week? Get hydrated the week before and don’t just guzzle it the morning before. Drinking water in large volumes the day before the race wont make you run faster. We believe getting SOS into you the night before and in the week leading up until you are hydrated works very well. If you have hydrated consistently the week before, then the morning of the race you don’t need to over-hydrate – all the work has been done. Take sips of SOS for thirst but you should be fine if the week before has gone well. Nothing worse than finding the toilet on the start line!
  1. Race time? Sorry but many race courses do not provide great products for runners, too much sugar and often causing you to get back into the sugar cycle. Our athletes take SOS in a variety of ways 1) in a fuel belt diluted, 2) as a concentrate in a fuel belt and mix the concentrate with water at a station or 3) in longer races take the powder and mix on the go. Yes, it might not be the most time effective but trust me you will finish faster doing it this way – cramping may even cause you to stop and finish competing. Or if you are really lucky a race will be serving SOS on the course! Lots more races to come next year as well.
  1. Afterwards? It is all about recovery and getting hydrated. A good check is urine volume and colour and if you are smart enough to have weighed yourself before and afterwards then you will have a great gauge on how much sweat you have lost. Replace it 1:1 SOS for sweat loss.
  1. Finally good luck. If you have any questions about your experiences feel free to email us and we will talk you through your hydration plan. Email info@sosrehydrate.com. For Gaz at Getrunning see www.getrunning.co.nz.

And if your stocks are low get your SOS online now  Run Faster!!

Its all about the hydration
Its all about the hydration

SOS Rehydrate Top 5 Tips: starting marathon training

in SOS MAGAZINE/Uncategorized by

SOS Rehydrate Top 5 Tips: starting marathon training

Congrats, your marathon entry has been accepted.  Now the realization dawns that you need to get a wiggle on and start training.

To make the most success of your race, be it your first or your 90th, there are some things that you need to sort before the training begins.  2 lucky readers will get a great pair of Marshall headphones and a months supply of SOS and will be selected from those shared on social media.

SOS is rehydration for runners
SOS is rehydration for runners

The Top 5:

Number 1 and close to our heart:

Hydration Strategy – A 2% loss in body weight through dehydration can lead to a 20% loss in performance.  Probably more important than clothing is your hydration and fueling strategy.  Get used to running with SOS at the start of your program and learn when to hydrate.  This is before, during and after.  So many people start training and forget hydrating after a run, which leads to compounding your dehydration status until it affects your performance.

 

The rehydration drink
The rehydration drink

2 – Running Style – We ran (no pun intended) a blog on running style a few months back (http://sosrehydrate.com/top-5-tips-for-running/) Its key that you get your mechanics moving in one direction. If your body is in line then your injuries will be reduced.  The best time to learn is when starting back or refocusing on training again after a break.

 

3 – Core Strength – Our resident fitness expert Sean Bartram (Core Pilates and Fitness) stresses the need for a solid core.  This keeps your style strong throughout the marathon and you injury free.  Simple pilates routines can help with this.  Check out the blog we ran the other day on his core stability routine.

 

4 – Equipment – Trainers / sneakers that have been properly fitted and that suit your gait are essential.  We suggest buying a few pairs so that you have the same trainers to run in as you train in.  Shoe companies are constantly changing designs and there is nothing worse if the ole faithful trainers you have trained in suddenly go out of stock and you are left with blistered feet in a new pair of shoes.  A good sports store like Fleet Feet Sports, Up & Running and Shoe Clinic all will help you in your quest for good clothing and footware.

 

5 – Mix up the runs – Keep off the treadmill unless you cant run outside due to conditions.  Mix off-road with hills, with speed work, with longer runs and vary the routes.  If aids enjoyment take your tunes with you! We recommend Marshall Headphones and are giving away a pair with a months supply of SOS to 2 people selected from our retweeters and / or sharers of #sosblog @sosrehydrate

 

We will be following up with a few more tips as we progress through our marathon training blogs

Good luck and happy rehydrated running!!

Buy your SOS here and that plan moving right away!

http://sosrehydrate.com/home/buy-sos/

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